Reviews for Echoes of Old Songs
Kingsdaughter613 chapter 5 . 7/25/2012
Very beautiful story. Sigh... Poor Maglor is still singing his Noldolante though it is probably much longer now for he has so much more to mourn. Excellent job.
Nessa Annare chapter 1 . 4/8/2009
I love reading this fanfic. Being a great lover of music, to me, this fic started out like music itself. First in a simple melody then drifs into few complex but easily understood notes and lastly back to simple but solemn tone. Beautiful.
Jimmy Candlestick chapter 2 . 12/21/2008
i liked that...a lot.
Gil-galadriel chapter 2 . 12/14/2008
This was-amazing. Beautiful, and haunting, and so full of meaning. I don't think the Noldolante was ever published, but one can almost hear it drifting from the screen.

"The Noldolante, so achingly simple, was none of these things. And that, perhaps, was why it endured so long after its creation, when his other, more technically sophisticated music was overlooked or forgotten. Thousands of years after Alqualonde, the Eldar still wept when they heard the lament for paradise lost…" Right. On.

My one critique (and I feel guilty for doing so) is really a nitpick. "it was as if it was his first time again, hearing the words in the hoarse-velvet tones of Maglor himself, on the night before the last assault on Thangorodrim." Assuming this is the night before Nirnaeth Arnoediad, I'm pretty sure Gil-galad would have been at the havens at Sirion.
Jimmy Candlestick chapter 1 . 4/11/2008
that was beautiful.
Vana Tuivana chapter 1 . 5/12/2006
Lovely, bittersweet, and full of history. I love the idea of the Noldolante being kind of a part of the consciousness of the people. Great writing.
Naz chapter 1 . 5/9/2006
Can't find words for this. Just saying "it was sad" is far too little.
dansemacabre chapter 1 . 5/8/2006
I've read very little LOTR fanfic and can't manage to keep most of Tolkien's complex universe in my head to fully appreciate the detailed stuff, but I liked this one-shot very much. I especially liked the parts about the music being over (and under) laid with meaning to both the bard and the audience.