Reviews for Acheron in White
Theodore Barrington chapter 1 . 2/10/2011
Well done you!

THIS is how it's done...
cherrysmex23 chapter 1 . 3/10/2007
...wow.

That mad eme laugh..b/c its so serious...but its really well-written!

I hate that Yeti/Sasquatch guy. I can never get past him... TToTT
chesauroshin chapter 1 . 2/11/2007
This is hilarious! And very well-written, too.

I applaud you.
Ember Nickel chapter 1 . 10/1/2006
Well, that was dark.

Nice, though. Shakespearean sonnets are awesome.
Cerse Liminara chapter 1 . 9/30/2006
Would it help or hurt to tell you that I've made it past the Yeti five times?
Todd B. James chapter 1 . 9/27/2006
Awesome, awesome, awesome.

This game always made me angry, in that no matter what I did, that freakin' sasquatch would always chow down on my hide. This made it feel an almost noble pursuit; the damned soul trying with all his might to seek redemption-at least escape-from his eternal torments, only to find that the promise of escape is actually the greatest implement of torture of all: false hope.

The line "the damned souls you pass will pay you no heed" perfectly captures the feeling I always got when I took down a snowboarder or passed a skier who got eaten before me (If my memory serves, the monster ate other people, right?). It also illustrated how you felt alone in the game, despite the presence of many other downhill snowsport enthusiasts.

Another line that captures the futility of attempting to evade your fate was "The only way through, a ruch of blind speed." I never got very far after the finish line once the monster got me in his sights, but I always tried. I guess that was the core of the gameplay, if you think about it long enough: evade the insatiable monster.

And the final line also clues us into the 'hell is repetition' vibe, letting us know that no matter what score we got, no matter how long we evaded the abominable, no matter how many trees we set on fire, and no matter how many others we took out on our way to our doom, it would always be right back at the beginning once we were through.

Once again, I applaud your ability to wring meaning from the mundane, nobility from the null, and substance from the silly, all the while making us laugh at the ironic absurdity of it all. Bravo, bravo.

-T.J.