Reviews for He scares the other children
BinominalNomenclature chapter 3 . 1/8
Wow... This is brilliant. A really good idea, to begin with. I've always been fascinated by Dumbledore's visit to the orphanage, and this story gives you a really good view on it. You're writing style is unique, and I love it. Especially the way you've written this; changing through people's thought patterns, which is a very difficult thing to do. However, you have done it very well. Thanks for writing this, it's amazing!

—BinominalNomenclature :)
GSYH chapter 3 . 11/14/2007
Poor twisted child.

I remember hearing on a CSI episode about how sociopaths are form when they could feel no sense of security in their childhood, none at all. They'll always have to be calculating and cautious, always. They can't trust.
GSYH chapter 2 . 11/14/2007
I like how Dumbledore didn't associate Tom being a Parselmouth with being ebil, I wonder if it was Voldemort who started that association in the first place? Him and his snake in skull.
GSYH chapter 1 . 11/14/2007
I feel so bad for the boy Tom still is though.
Minerva McGonagall Rox chapter 3 . 10/13/2007
This is great, you captured Tom's personality quite well. It is my official opinion that Tom is what's known as a head case. :-)
DailyProphetEditor chapter 3 . 8/18/2007
Another very good fic you wrote there. I love the insights in the Tom Riddle chapter, the way he was thinking... with all those little things like deciding to be nice 'n polite to Dumbldedore because Dumbledore is a man one needs to charm.

And the Mrs Cole part was just great. No, of course she'd never dream of drinking gin during working hours, it's all just being a good host *g*
wynnleaf chapter 3 . 6/11/2007
Well written and creepy. I didn't feel like got "into" Riddle's head as comfortably as you did Dumbledore and Mrs. Cole. Still, that just adds a bit to the creepy feeling.
Silver Sailor Ganymede chapter 3 . 6/11/2007
Very nicely written, you characterisations were excellent.
Bagge chapter 3 . 5/13/2007
Self sufficient, different, calculating and a really nasty piece of work. Good portrait of Tom Riddle. He really is a calculating young man. He has known about the existance of a magical world for five minutes - and he already makes plan for how he is to gain power in it, what he can hide and can't hide from Dumbledore, how he is to handle other wizards... oh my.

Of course young Tom Riddle had his eyes on the powerful german führer. I think we call all agree that things would have been much better if he really had read Biggles rather than Hitler. (And the newsreel was a nice little piece of zeitgeist).

Tom's fear of being a freak - or mad - is another thing that connects him to Harry. However - where Harry wants to belong, Tom wants to be special. He's only reaction to the thoughts of other children like himself is apprehension. Tom's pride over Albus' reaction to his parseltounge abilites rings very true.

"he'd said, "Prove it", in the voice that makes the little kids and the more dense of the bigger ones do what he wants " - Very good description of wandless, unformal magic.

"Dumbledore had a wand, and he didn't," - the main lesson Tom Riddle learned that day.

"when they’d climbed down to the cave, he’d slipped – but he hadn’t fallen, he’d flown" - You know, that really reminds me of Neville's first magical breakthrough. No other paralells suggested.

You have made Albus, Tom and Mrs Cole full justice in this very, very canon piece. You have explained the main differences in Albus' and Tom's world view, and why they came off on the wrong foot from the beginning. Well done.
Bagge chapter 2 . 5/13/2007
Albus is caring and tries to work things out as good as he can, but even if he is used to the complex things children with budding magic can be, he is not at all prepared to face the very nasty work that is young Tom Riddle.

His manipulation of mrs Cole was smooth, and I enjoyed those glimpses of legimancy - and of Tom's attempt to use it and block it.

You pointed out the perhaps most important detail Albus got wrong - not to demonstrate how things are not to be done. Because we learn by example... But I don't think you really managed to answer the question of what Albus really COULD have done with Tom Riddle to steer him away from the path of the future Lord Voldemort. However, neither has Rowling.

Those glimpses you gave of the current politics in the wizarrding world were interesting. Albus musings about the difficulty with muggle/wizard relationships, and of course, the rising treat of Grindelwald. Fitting that Albus knows which families are rumored to be parselmouths - in such a small and prejudicated society as the wizarding world - those things are known.

"when you’ve lived ninety years, a mere twenty seem to pass in a moment..." - and he will see another fifty years - no doubt moving even faster.

"there’s a spell to make people do what you want, and it's a very Dark spell indeed" - even unforgivable. Figures that Tom had a rudementary idea about Imperious even before he knew about formal magic.

"he’d really hoped that the boy would be sensible, would own up to his misbehaviour and avoid further humiliation" Albus really doesn't see how much authority he has over a small kid who has never seen anyone except himself do magic before - and how he inspires fear rather than regret. And with fear comes hunger for power - to be able to make other people fear you...

"Worthless little trinkets, really, unless you know what they mean to the children they belong to - pauper children in a Muggle orphanage where they struggle just to feed and clothe them ..." - and of course the symbolic value of victory and power.
Bagge chapter 1 . 5/13/2007
A relaistic and sympatic portrait of a sharp and hardworking muggle, caught in the crossfire between the two most powerful wizards in mordern times. Mrs Cole is fair and honest enough, but she is most of all a pragmatic dealing with a very difficult kid.

Those glimpses of wizarding eccentrics were nice touches - the overstamped letter, Merope's clothes, and of course Albus apperance itself. Neat description of how that charmed letter appeared to the one subject of it. A rather blurry sense of everything being all right.

"he scares the staff, I know Martha for one is afraid of him ..." he would, wouldn't he? I can imagine young Tom Riddle being a very scary kid indeed. I wonder what Mrs Cole suspected, how different she really thought that Tom Riddle was.
cmwinters chapter 3 . 5/11/2007
Oh man, this is *completely* fantastic, and of course it makes me only want to know what happened when Tom was like, eighteen months, and what happened in the cave, and all that.
Mother of Tears chapter 3 . 5/7/2007
This little trio is really neat. Very good interpretation.

Oh, by the way. If you are going to be doing more Tom stories, it might be interesting to see how you write the confrontation between Tom and his father, or the interraction between Tom and Slughorn. Is it possible that Tom could have known Eileen Prince? The possibilities are endless.
ippogrifo chapter 3 . 5/6/2007
Tom Riddle is a very nasty character.

In your story, from his point of view, is really creeping, disturbing.

There is never a moment in which you can sympathize with this child, plus orphan.

It is true that right because he lives in an orphanage, he must be more selfish, he have to grow up fast but it is really alarming to know how works his mind and to know that DD will lose control on him.

It surprises that while the headmaster reckons Tom’s skills in manipulating people, in understanding when it is good to be polite or use his charm, still he insists in the plan.

Like you write “he is impressed with his abilities and maybe even a little bit afraid…”

Thanks for this insightful tale.
ippogrifo chapter 2 . 5/6/2007
So here we have a great Dumbledore.

It’s a part of the book where we see the old professor in his full manipulative action, dispensing magnetism and magic, carefully inspiring curiosity, fear, sense of discipline and confidence.

You seem, rightly, to underline a certain superficiality in DD’s decision of taking care of Riddle.

He underestimated the boy (or overestimated his own skills in handling people) and his fault will have enormous repercussions. Maybe DD thought of this error when he says to Harry that clever people tend to make spectacular errors.

Very good the battle of minds, the game in Legilimency and Occlumency.
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