Reviews for I'll Catch You if You Fall
Sinistrae chapter 1 . 10/2/2007
Terrific! I had the same theory about Chocolat's feelings for Satine and I really wish he had received more attention. Excellent story.
knowlove chapter 1 . 8/3/2007
When I watched the movie I always thought that la chocolat had this secret love for Satine, and he was defiantly one of my favorite character. He was always in the background not saying anything, but his mystery was intriguing. And he was the one who saved Satine's life more than once over the course of the movie not Christian. It was very nicely written and you don't have to worry...you most certainly did him justice.
dresdendollontheprowl chapter 1 . 7/4/2007
True, Chocolat didn't get as much spotlight as the others. You did a wonderful job putting him in the spot light. Beautifully written.
alsdssg chapter 1 . 6/28/2007
I loved that. Poor Chocolat. The thing about him giving her up to Christian was really beautiful. I like idea of him loving her so much that he only wanted what was best for her even if it didn't mean being with him. I also like how he knew everything first, I mean, that she was dying and that she was falling.
Fwe chapter 1 . 6/28/2007
Very good. I completely agree. He was so underappreciated, and I love the character you gave him. I wondered how he felt all during that movie, and now I know. Wonderfully done. Beautiful writing. Great job. :)

~Fwe
DaydreamingTurtle chapter 1 . 6/27/2007
Amazingly sweet (no pun intended)!
Rosemarie-ouhisama chapter 1 . 6/27/2007
He is underappreciated - by Baz as well as by the fanfic world - but you do him justice here. The metaphor of the perfume - the contrast of the sweetness with the rot of sickness and death - is very well done; I love the way you carry it through and bring it back in unexpected moments.

Reading this makes me wonder anew what sort of challenges a black man living in 19th C Paris would have faced, particularly in an era when non-whites were still seen as something less than human, or closer to the apes. One of the most popular pieces of art at the galleries for the '89 Universal Exposition in Paris was a sculpture, by a French artist, of an ape carrying off a white woman, a metaphor for European fears of the "dark other".

Of course Baz, like many white directors, uses different races and ethnic groups as side characters in his films without really exploring their stories, but to give a bit of color and, as in Strictly Ballroom, a sense of soul and coolness that whites presumably don't have on their own but are willing (like Baz himself unfortunately) to steal and exploit.