Reviews for Almost Home
JoiForber chapter 1 . 5/2/2012
Our House...by Crosby, Stills and Nash

I'll light the fire

You put the flowers in the vase

That you bought today

Staring at the fire

For hours and hours

While I listen to you

Play your love songs

All night long for me

Only for me

Come to me now

And rest your head for just five minutes

Everything is good

Such a cosy room

The windows are illuminated

By the sunshine through them

Fiery gems for you

Only for you

Our house is a very, very fine house

With two cats in the yard

Life used to be so hard

Now everything is easy

'Cause of you

And our la,la,la, la,la, la, la, la, la, la, la...

Our house is a very, very fine house

With two cats in the yard

Life used to be so hard

Now everything is easy

'Cause of you

And Our

I'll light the fire

And you place the flowers in the jar

That you bought today

I read this Fic while listening to this song...totally set the mood...
Emery Saks chapter 1 . 11/18/2010
I love so many things about this story - Marian's innocent comment about the tower room being a good music room, Mrs. Paroo's not-so-subtle hinting around, the tender moment with the hairpin and then Harold's teasing yet serious comment about a nursery.

All of these give great buildup for Being in Love and make it all the more powerful now knowing the events the precipitated it.

The hairpin scene has got to be my favorite. As you said, it's so deliciously domestic, and the fact that Marian allows him to do so without any hesitation or scolding speaks wonders about her confidence and comfort level with Harold. I love that he keeps one, too!

Winthrop is adorable with his tree fort, and his innocent assumption that Harold will be a part of his life is endearing. It's a good thing Harold is so in love with Marian. That poor man didn't stand a chance with the Paroo family! ;D
Clio1792 chapter 1 . 10/11/2010
Yeah, yeah, we know that actions speak louder than words, but when are guys gonna get that girls need the verbiage, too? Notwithstanding actions, it is a man's word that is his "bond."

This was great-what's consistently good here is that Harold sets about organizing his life with Marian by stealth-the establishment of a local business, the clever purchase of a house, setting about to furnish it precisely and perfectly (the mirror line was funny)-because Harold is used to ordering and manipulating his environment, and this is the "muscle memory" of a man who has been on his own, and on the lam, for a long, long, time. He can tell himself that he's doing it "properly," and at the same time, give himself plenty of decompression time before he takes that final, scary step into contract.

Your grasp of his psychological profile is superb.

Clio