Reviews for Populating Wizarding America
Alex Aces chapter 1 . 7/6/2014
Fascinating, and so helpful. Thank you.
hunanyian chapter 1 . 2/28/2013
This is pretty well thought out, and thanks for doing so. I'm going for the Native wizards were less effected by disease/conquest, so there's a much more indigenous influence on my version of American Wizarding. Glad to your analysis, and from other reviewers, I'm not alone in such a conclusion.
CeliaSingsSongs chapter 1 . 10/31/2012
I agree with almost everything except MA should have a much higher population. It puts enormous value on education.
Plus it is very old and famously haunted.
Plus think of all the irish english settlers. Wizards would live there for the quality of education and for the history.
Princess613 chapter 1 . 5/21/2012
A very well thought out essay.
lambtoslaughter chapter 1 . 5/7/2012
I found your article to be fascinating; you definitely made some interesting points, and the fact that you took the time to calculate all of this information out is pretty cool! I read an article one time where someone broke down the demographics of Harry's classmates and where they're all from in Britain, their socio-economic statuses and races, and how they represent very closely the larger scale of Britain's population. It was pretty interesting... I'd probably just start writing without thinking a thing about the numbers, but it's cool that other writers make the effort!

And to address the comment a couple people made about not seeing why wizards would have migrated to the US in the first place... are you kidding me? Witches were persecuted in Europe, remember? burned at stakes and stoned and all that... of course, those prejudices and persecution continued here *famously as we all know in Salem* but it's not as though those leaving Britain could have known that. (even though it's mentioned that real witches, like Wendelin the weird, couldn't actually be harmed by burning at the stake, one can still assume they had no desire to be discriminated against, if only on principal.) not to mention that i'm sure wizards and witches have desires to see the world just like muggles do- why should we assume all purebloods would just stay in England forever?
iwright chapter 1 . 2/29/2012
I once read a population estimate for Wizarding Britain writen by a geneticist. I forgot to bookmark the article and can't remember where I saw it, but it made some good points. The main point was that the class-size at Hogwarts probably represents a tiny birth-cohort. Harry Potters classmates, and their older siblings, are the kids conceived and born during the height of Voldemort's first terror-campaign. Based on this, the writer estimated that the adult population of Wizarding Britain was anywhere from 10000-20000, probably closer to 10000-15000, including not just wizards and witches but also 'Squibs' (Who we know have some sort of magical ability, because at least some of them can see spirits). I use the higher range for my own fanfic because it's the only way I can imagine Wizarding Britain having an isolated village, several encampments within Muggle towns, a commercial district/high street, several quidditch teams, two daily papers, a 'wireless'/radio network, a hospital, etc...

Anyway, this is a good essay. Very easy to follow. Thanks.
jambi chapter 1 . 1/20/2012
I found this really interesting. I've been thinking about the American Wizard population for a while. The thing I'm stuck on is how many pureblood families immigrated to America after its discovery. People originally moved her to make money, for adventure, or for freedoms they were denied elsewhere. It doesn’t seem like to many pureblood families would have a need to leave Wizarding Britain. What effect would this have on American Wizards? If they didn’t have Pureblood influence would they mingle more or less with local muggles? Would the half-blood population be significantly greater in America?

This is pure conjecture…sorry if I went into a rant there :)

Overall really liked your essay!
Liz Merryfeather chapter 1 . 1/15/2012
I follow your logic in this, however I have to disagree. I think from the many interview J.K has given that the wizardry population would be bigger than you estimate in America. As for attendance at the world cup, I think the number would have been really high, and not just for storytelling purposes, but because it IS the only game in town (as you say). Otherwise a very interesting take on things.
Dr. Platypus chapter 1 . 1/14/2012
Thanks for the reviews, everyone. Just to clarify:

Taure: The 1:10,000 ratio I'm working with is simply a mathematical ratio. The wizarding population is about 1/10,000 the size of the Muggle population. I'm not making any assumptions about how many of those are pureblood, half-blood, muggle-born, or even squib. Sorry I wasn't clearer.

Shadowryder: The "city limits" of DC is only a small portion of the DC Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes counties in Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland as well as DC itself. The population of the entire MSA is nearly 10 times that of DC itself.
shadowryder chapter 1 . 1/14/2012
Wow, this is really detailed and well thought out.

The one thing that I'm confused about is Washington D.C. - in the overall population, you list it as having a magical population of only 60, yet you later list it as a top 20 wizarding population center with a magical population of 564.
Taure chapter 1 . 1/9/2012
This is an admirable attempt at coming up with some facts for wizarding America.

However, I feel that you're missing something pretty key in all your discussion of demographics: purebloods. All of your figures are calculated from Muggleborns (number of wizards per Muggle). This seems to miss the key aspect of wizarding families having magical children, which should constitute the majority of wizarding population.

I also think your analysis is rather ahistorical. Possibly the most important factor in considering the demographics of the US wizarding world is the level of immigration by wizards to the US. If this was low to non-existent, then the US would have a relatively low population, given no magical population base. It will have to develop entirely from Muggleborns. Further, and even more crucially, if there weren't sufficient wizard immigrants then there wouldn't have been any wizarding society to induct Muggleborns into the magical community, except for whatever magical society the Native Americans had. Without immigration, the flavour of US magical culture may be extremely different to that of US Muggle culture, having its roots in Native American society rather than European society.

Still, like I say, an admirable attempt.

My own vision of US magical culture is as described above: significantly Native American in nature, as I don't see why European wizards would be motivated to migrate to America like their Muggle counterparts.
kikila chapter 1 . 1/8/2012
This gives a really interesting insight into Wizarding America. I am definitely going to recommend it to my friend planning on writing a WA story. I might even write one myself!
Inverarity chapter 1 . 1/3/2012
Somewhere there is a post I wrote for a fan fiction forum in which I speculated along similar lines. I worked out numbers given a range of ratios, from 1 wizard per 2000 Muggles (almost certainly too many) to 1 wizard per 20,000 Muggles (probably too rare).

My numbers were pretty similar to yours. I also speculated that some countries may have a higher wizard population density than others, and tried to figure out what these numbers (or a hypothetical average of 30-40 new students per year at Hogwarts) says about the wizarding birthrate.

But the bottom line is, Rowling's numbers are tosh 'cause she can't do math. ;)
So this is real life chapter 1 . 1/2/2012
Excellent and well detailed analysis; just a note - Inverarity is a guy (I thought he was a woman at first as well, but he's posted about his frustration with people thinking he's female on his livejournal)
Little Old Anonymous Me chapter 1 . 1/1/2012
I think that, since there are students being educated at Hogwarts from Ireland and Scotland, that American wizardry schools would probably include some students from the parts of provinces in Canada that are closer to continental US, such as British Columbia. Hawaii and Alaska might have their own schools, as with Guam and Puerto Rico, as the first language of those territories is not English.
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