Reviews for Contemplations
Me chapter 17 . 2/20/2015
Excellent!
bonesteel chapter 16 . 11/17/2013
Beautifully thought provoking' what will happen to them after the war. It is very well written, keep up the good work
smithcrafter chapter 17 . 12/30/2012
I think the epilogue is actually the best chapter. The rest were a little depressing. This one brought it back to a happier ending. I liked them all, but thank you for the happy ending, anyway.
Snooky chapter 17 . 12/29/2012
Brilliantly done. A fitting conclusion to a very touching and meaningful story. Good to see Langenscheidt going into publishing. They are still selling the dictionaries on Amazon, but no sign of the book you mentioned. LOL. And even the bitter, have found the happiness that they deserve. (except Hochstetter, of course)

Appreciated Hogan's thought at the end. Reminds me of a few of my stories.
konarciq chapter 17 . 12/29/2012
Oh, Klink's is just absolutely perfect... I confess I don't recall the details of *all* the previous chapters (too long ago probably), but the unconditional love of a pet - yes, that's exactly what someone like Klink needs.

And Langenscheidt going into publishing. LOL I didn't know they published anything *but* dictionaries and language courses? Or is that a development from later years?

Many of these are really touching, and I'm so glad I stuck with this till the end.

And Hogan's... yes. "He who saves a single life..." etc

Well done - thank you for sharing this with us!
ColHogan chapter 17 . 12/29/2012
Sorry to see this end. But It's good to see that everybody found peace and in some small way, a bit of happiness by their choices in life or in what they did during the war. And except for Hochstetter, all the others seemed to have come to terms with things. I think Hogan's said it all. While he couldn't help everybody or even most of them, the ones they did help made what he did worth it.
Hildegaarde chapter 16 . 12/28/2012
After reading the prequel 'Reflections' I think it's ironic that during the war, all these characters found some hope or encouragement through the example of Hogan, and knew that they had a part to play and a task to accomplish. But now that the war is over and their role in it has ended -it would seem to an observer that they should be at peace- but they each seem to be struggling with their place and their purpose.

I'me very much looking forward to seeing how the epilogue develops!
konarciq chapter 16 . 12/24/2012
For a moment there I was a little confused - thought it was the Goldman from the show (one of the guys in the back row, who seems to have an agreed name of Goldman here, no matter how many different names he got to use over the years).

But this really was a painful tale for Hogan. It's the kind of thing we have him do regularly in fanfic - but on the show I don't think it was every really brought up. Which probably means they would have run across this kind of thing - with the inevitable remorse as you describe here if they were forced to turn it down.

Still, I do think someone like Hogan, military or not, would at least occasionally defy orders of the kind. Or perhaps that's wishful thinking and too much influence from MASH lately...
snooky-9093 chapter 16 . 12/23/2012
A question that many of us have thought. What would Hogan have done? It's been explored in many stories, including some of my own. And I'm sure if the situation was real, he and all of his men would have been haunted by the what ifs for all of their lives.
ColHogan chapter 16 . 12/23/2012
How ironic that Hogan would meet Goldmann on the same train. It's like it was fate they would meet. And after listening to the man's story, Hogan regrets a decision he made by not questioning London's orders and by agreeing to do nothing when everything in him cried out for him to do something to help those he was ordered no to. But that would have to eat at Hogan is a man who followed orders even if he didn't agree with them as in this one case.
snooky-9093 chapter 15 . 12/16/2012
So sad, and heartfelt. But I think her parents were wrong, for years later, in retrospect, she may realize that even if she touched one person, or saved one man, it would be worth it.
ColHogan chapter 15 . 12/16/2012
Poor Helga. She was so enthusiastic when she graduated after studying nursing, a most honorable occupation. How her parents couldn't see that and support her is beyond me. She should also be commended for not becoming a machine incapable of feeling anything for anybody like that doctor. I hope one day she realizes her parents were wrong in their belief in her chosen profession. She might not see it now, but maybe eventually I hope she will see she did make a difference to those she treated if only for a little while.
konarciq chapter 15 . 12/16/2012
Just having reread my own "Helga's Hero" this morning, this is a very interesting development indeed! Of course the stories don't match up, but maybe there is something in her character that led both of us to the belief that there was something medical and compassionate running in her family! The reasons you give here for Helga's choice of becoming a nurse are virtually the same as the ones I ascribed to Helga's mother in my story!

Her reason for leaving Stalag 13 to become a nurse I find therefore very believable ;-) Though I wonder what her parents thought of her working as a secretary in the prison camp then!

Anyway, dearest Helga, I love you all the more for your inability to become a machine - even under these circumstances. And I'm sure that somewhere down the line, you'll realize there was some worth in it somewhere, even if you don't see it now. (And if it's any consolation, I'm sure that *my* version of your parents would have been all encouragement for your choice. Maybe you should just switch stories LOL)
Snooky chapter 14 . 12/9/2012
Oh, that is so sad. I can see him doing this. But never fear, the English love their flowers and gardens, and I'm sure that eventually business for happy occasions will improve. (maybe during the Royal Wedding!)
Jennaya chapter 14 . 12/9/2012
Powerful look at post war England, sad and eloquent.
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