Reviews for One Hundred Days of Summer
Caskettfan28 chapter 100 . 3/8/2013
Just...thank u for this story
Ariel119 chapter 85 . 3/8/2013
Love!
Ariel119 chapter 69 . 3/7/2013
Ohhhhh. I hate it when mom and dad fight...
Allison Mckenzie chapter 100 . 3/6/2013
Oh my goodness...what extraordinary talent you two are...seriously...I've had to change so many plans so I could continue to read this wonderful story...dare I say I like your characters as much as Mr Marlowe's himself...your scenario's are so very believable...at one stage I didn't like the sentence about Castle "he's so much easier to love when he's asleep...however on reflection...I now love it...as it's something I personally think in relation to my noisy, lively twin boys...lol...so many many congratulation on this wonderful writing...alas I'm sad it came to an end...however...I can now peruse your other works...
SombodyIUsedToKnow chapter 100 . 1/20/2013
Great story! I hope you're proud!
SombodyIUsedToKnow chapter 94 . 1/20/2013
"It will be this case."

You got me choked up again! The fierceness in this statement!
SombodyIUsedToKnow chapter 83 . 1/19/2013
Can't believe this made me cry. Gotta keep going!
bashfuljen03 chapter 100 . 1/18/2013
This story has consumed me for the past week; now I don't know what to do with my life.
CassieBookWorm8 chapter 100 . 1/10/2013
Quite a ride. Thanks.
CassieBookWorm8 chapter 87 . 1/4/2013
Love this chapter.
mylenepink chapter 100 . 12/16/2012
Awesome, beautiful and amazingly fun story. Had a great time reading it, thank both of you very much for writing this!
CassieBookWorm8 chapter 8 . 11/28/2012
This may seem off topic, please don't take offense, but rather feel joy that your words touched me and made me want to share this this web link with you, those readers who felt touched by the scene between Kate, Castle, and Martha.

As a brief background, this comes from a movie where an Indian boy meets a much lower-class Indian girl, they marry, and the boy's parents cut off all contact, leaving the couple so pained they escape to England, fleeing from the parents anger and disappointment, but the two always yearn for the parents' love. The younger brother (pink turtle neck sweater) has just just arrived and (unrecognized) and is boarding in the couple's house under pretense of an exchange student. He wants to reunite the family, and so puts his sister-in-law on the phone with his mother, her mother-in-law, unbeknownst to either women that they are connected - the are family and yet strangers. This is in the tradition of the Indian holiday Karva Chauth. This scene has always moved me, and this chapter of "One Hundred Days of Summer" also made me feel, so, although there are major differences, here is my "text-to-film" connection. : )

Thank you for letting me ramble, I will in another, less convoluted, message sing my praises for the author, which I should have done long before because I have read nearly all her work, _loved_ it, and have never reviewed because I have felt my words of gratitude and awe could never live up to her writing. I will now say, though, that the compliment "You are going to be a great writer soon" does not even cover the author because you already are.

Anyways, for you:
watch?vd6KlB780Csc&listUU5ZaNiLuzsp6a4uPWTQiWeg &index18&featureplcp
(Watch 2:57 to 6:57)
CassieBookWorm8 chapter 8 . 11/28/2012
This may seem off topic, please don't take offense, but rather feel joy that your words touched me and made me want to share this this web link with you, those readers who felt touched by the scene between Kate, Castle, and Martha.

As a brief background, this comes from a movie where an Indian boy meets a much lower-class Indian girl, they marry, and the boy's parents cut off all contact, leaving the couple so pained they escape to England, fleeing from the parents anger and disappointment, but the two always yearn for the parents' love. The younger brother (pink turtle neck sweater) has just just arrived and (unrecognized) and is boarding in the couple's house under pretense of an exchange student. He wants to reunite the family, and so puts his sister-in-law on the phone with his mother, her mother-in-law, unbeknownst to either women that they are connected - the are family and yet strangers. This is in the tradition of the Indian holiday Karva Chauth. This scene has always moved me, and this chapter of "One Hundred Days of Summer" also made me feel, so, although there are major differences, here is my "text-to-film" connection. : )

Thank you for letting me ramble, I will in another, less convoluted, message sing my praises for the author, which I should have done long before because I have read nearly all her work, _loved_ it, and have never reviewed because I have felt my words of gratitude and awe could never live up to her writing. I will now say, though, that the compliment "You are going to be a great writer soon" does not even cover the author because you already are.

Anyways, for you:
watch?vd6KlB780Csc&listUU5ZaNiLuzsp6a4uPWTQiWeg &index18&featureplcp
(Watch 2:57 to 6:57)
Peter Gunn chapter 99 . 11/12/2012
Re: Your notes in the next chapter about adding conflict for reality.

As a writer, I am only an amateur, but as an editor I am convinced that the number of professional writers who seek the worst possible reality or insist on trouble and pain in every chapter or page - as opposed to those pros who don't use extremes as crutches - are merely leaning on cliched devices instead of writing. The old comments saying anything that isn't bad is fluff are so old and trite the mold on their mold is growing mold.
Peter Gunn chapter 53 . 11/12/2012
Just got around to reading this series and am assuming there was a typo on the first page.

"there's still a surprising amount of people on the beach,"

You used "amount" correctly in most places (amount of time) etc., but things you can count - like people - are referred to as "numbers of people" not "amounts of people."
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