Reviews for Child Endangerment
Guest chapter 1 . 7/15
AWESOME!I LOVE THIS! It makes so much sense.
bookworm661 chapter 1 . 5/17
Certainly food for thought; over something most didn't think about twice when first reading about the incident in POA. Great job.
malfoy lea chapter 1 . 5/9
Hi there! The original plan was to read your one-shots and then review them all at once. The review would have been something like: "OH my god, I cant believe I havent read any of your work until today!" However, my plans changed when I fell over the word "defenestrate". I have never heard it before and had to google it. Seriously, its awesome! I didnt know theres an English word for "throwing someone out of the window", as it is translated. Maybe it is stress-induced; I should do other things than getting lost in the internet; but I laughed far too much about it.
Back to "Child Endangerment": Severus Snape is a very enjoyable character. I love his snarkiness, and if he had been a little bit less of an outcast/introvert in the books, I guess he would have destroyed Lupin exactly like that. Snape is so wonderfully in-character, and I know that I am incapable of writing him the way he should be written, so I can appreciate writers who are able to do it.
Your writing is nice to read, and I suspect without spelling errors, although Im no judge for that.
I wish you a good day and will continue with reading the rest :D
Leo
Guest chapter 1 . 3/17
afaik, boggarts do not do that.
Broadwayfreak5357 chapter 1 . 1/15
I really liked this story! Loten suggested it at the end of one of her stories, and I thought it was brilliant! I've honestly never really liked Lupin and I thought he got off too easy in terms of his dealings with Severus. Looking forward to reading more of your stories! Happy writing :)
xx Sage
Guest chapter 1 . 10/7/2015
That... makes a frightening amount of sense. I've seen crossovers posted where someone's boggart was a Weeping Angel from Doctor Who and how very very bad that would be ("that which holds the image of an Angel becomes itself an Angel"); and I've seen plenty of alternative choices for various peoples boggarts; but it never occurred to me someone would think of the bloody Basilisk.
Considering the Hogwarts Rumour Mill, the people most likely to be affected by the idea of the Basilisk itself are only the ones who actually saw it- most people spent the year hearing all sorts of theories and terrified of /something/ but didn't know it was a basilisk. A large point to the plot was that no one made the connection of the "monster" being a basilisk until Hermione figured it out, got petrified, and then Harry and Ron found out just the same night they had to rescue Ginny. So most of the school only found out anything about it /after/ it was dead.
So the only people likely to be scared enough of it to think of it in that setting are the victims of the petrifaction, Ginny (who would probably be more scared of Tom), Harry (who killed it but /got bitten/), and Ron (who only saw the skin, but almost lost both his sister and his best friend to it).
Snape's argument is therefore still completely valid- Harry, Ron, and Hermione were all in that classroom, and only Ron's severe arachnophobia really saved them. (Harry and Hermione both didn't get to try, if I recall correctly. Lupin stopped Harry's chance and I think Hermione was next to him and didn't get to go because Harry got blocked before she could and then it was over.)

Continuing the line of thought it was also lucky that the various fears were not as aggressive as the real versions- a vampire with actual enhanced speed and strength could be very dangerous until some got a lucky shot or opened the curtains enough to let the sun stall it. A "Medusa" could be just as dangerous as a Basilisk- one look is all it takes; though certain myth-based Medusa-like creatures might only petrify, which they can fix.
Even if a boggart version of something is a weaker representation of anything it imitates, in an enclosed room full of /thirteen year olds/ it could still be so very dangerous.

Really, the only reason nothing dangerous happened is because boggarts just seem perfectly content to jump out, turn into something to scare the sense out of whoever's there, and /stay there/ while people scream or cry. (See when they were cleaning Grimmauld Place and Mrs. Weasley just sat there crying and occasionally hitting the boggart with a "riddikkulis" spell, and it stayed right there on the floor just shifting from dead person to different dead person. It didn't actually /do/ anything, like becoming an infieri/zombie instead of a corpse that could move to attack her.)
sunsethill chapter 1 . 8/6/2015
I think you are the first person I have read to point out that one of the students should have been afraid of a basilisk after the previous year, especially Hermione. Since the effects are muted with the boggart, I would argue for petrification, but they wouldn't know for sure, would they? Very nice catch showing that in addition to being demeaning to a colleague or to fellow students who had very personal information broadcast to the world, the lesson could have also been deadly.
Griffygnus chapter 1 . 12/7/2014
absolutely right, you are.
CharmedArtist chapter 1 . 6/11/2014
*nods*
RavenEcho chapter 1 . 5/7/2014
Interesting points! :-)
Crazy 109 chapter 1 . 1/24/2014
I really enjoyed this rant-fic. ] There are several characters in the HP universe that need lecturing with liberal use of a clue-by-four, and Professor Snape's nowhere near the worst-he's only the obvious target for everybody.

Hmm...no reviewer seems to have mentioned the power of the human mind, in regards to the boggart's ability to mock powers like the basilisk's stare. If the children had *believed,* utterly, that the boggart-basilisk's stare would kill them-they'd quite probably have *died,* just from their belief. Maybe not all of them, though seeing one classmate die could very well trigger more by reinforcing their belief; but even one dead child would have been too many, and obviously, Lupin hadn't spared even a moment's thought towards any possible danger to them (which seems a very Marauder attitude, unfortunately-Unintended consequences? What're those?). And the dangers of Professor Snape losing control of the little blighters in his classroom-yeah, I'd say he had a *definite* point there-even if canon wizards are portrayed as not seeming to feel any actual pain unless it's from something like a Crucio...
A ShrinkinG VIOLET GIrL chapter 1 . 1/22/2014
A good bashing story..severus has a good point..
TaleWeaver chapter 1 . 10/23/2013
You (and Snape) make some VERY good points, here. For quite some time now, I've thought that the reason (well, one of them) that Snape terrifies all his classes is because he teaches nearly the only class where an accident CAN'T be undone with a flick of a wand, in a world that doesn't seem to have any sort of ingrained safety regulations or even practise most common-sense OH&S rules.
To be honest, it's only been since the books finished that I truly came to understand how dangerous the insta-fix and subsequent lack of consequences in the wizard world are. Add in rich families and snobby parents who don't bother to actually punish their children, as long as they don't make the family look bad... Bellatrix was out-and-out psychotic, but to be honest? I'm pretty sure that Sirius was downright sociopathic. I keep wishing someone had straight-out asked Sirius if it ever once occurred to him, while planning his little 'prank' on Severus back in the day, (or even once in the fifteen-odd years since) that if anything went wrong Remus wouldn't have lived to see the dawn? Given the attitudes towards werewolves in the wizard world, I'm almost certain that Severus getting so much as a scratch, no matter how unimportant his family was, would have resulted in Remus' immediate execution, and very probably Dumbledore's immediate sacking.
PhiGirl chapter 1 . 8/27/2013
Somehow I think that boggarts turn into what you believe your greatest fear to be, not what it really is. I mean, banshees, snakes, mummies, a disembodied hand? And everyone consciously knows what their greatest fear is? That's just absurd.

Lupin (or Rowling) really didn't think that lesson through. What if someone feared an abusive parent, being raped or something along that line? Or just doesn't want to expose his/her greatest fear to the whole class?
I don't believe the boggart can be an actual physical danger. Could be, though, and if one accepts that then the basilisk scenario is both realistic and terrifying.

Since, as Snarky64 pointed out, boggarts seem to be common in the wizarding world and it is therefore important to know how to fight them, the better way to teach that would probably be without everyone else watching.
BarbaraKaterina chapter 1 . 8/6/2013
Hmm. You know, the boggart incident is actually probably the only thing where I don't agree with most SSHG authors and am on Remus' side (Severus really did behave abominably towards Neville at the beginning of that class, embarrassing him in front of a new teacher for no reason), but you are right that using the boggart was extremely risky. Though personally I'm more inclined to think that the whole "takes on properties of the feared object" is crap, that it just takes on the form, and that JKR simply didn't think it through (if I wanted to defend her, I could perhaps say that Harry was simply so freaked out by the dementors that outwards appearance was enough; but I'm afraid there are too many descriptions of what the boggart-dementor did to him for this idea to hold).

As for Neville being most afraid of Severus, I thin the only viable explanation is that he sort of projected his fears of the Lestranges to him, since he was the only Death Eater Neville had around...

It's sort of scary, really, when one thinks the years at Hogwarts through, in how many ways they could all have died...
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