Reviews for Borrowing Asfaloth
Yuki Suou chapter 1 . 1/12/2014
I would love to see Glorfindel's reaction to the Stealing xD
Elena of the Turks23 chapter 1 . 11/24/2013
I love this story it is so sweet and yet fearsome. I guess it's safe to say no matter who you are you just don't piss of Glorfindel. Great story.
Aria Breuer chapter 1 . 7/21/2013
Well, I must say this story is well-written.

Good gap-filler to the first live-action movie-version of how Arwen, not Glorfindel, ended up coming to Frodo's aide. At least in this one-shot, Glorfindel regains some recognition that he lost, due to the movie-version not fully explaining how Arwen ended up riding on his horse. Same goes to Elrond, since he was also scrutinized, due to Arwen - as Jackson and the screenwriters put it - having more screen-time (I didn't mind the fact that they wanted to show if she was capable of standing on her own, but stealing other characters' screen-times and glory is not the right way to do this; same to Tauriel, but she's another matter entirely and she's not canon, but an original character, in spite of what they say). Similar to other readers/reviewers of this story, long after the recent movie adaptations of the book trilogy was out, I wondered this about Arwen. As much as I am delighted Glorfindel and Elrond re-earned his recognition here, however much it is, Frodo has still lost that... I wonder if there is a way for him to regain the recognition he lost, due to the recent movie adaptations.

Good work.

Aria Breuer
Drollittle chapter 1 . 6/11/2013
...and then she sees, as if from a world beyond, the army of loyal Tolkien readers whose story she just changed, and she faints away. I love the story idea.

I also appreciate how your portrayal of Arwen is true to her femininity as Tolkien made her, yet also with a strong will.
Certh chapter 1 . 5/16/2013
Very nice! It's always bugged me that it was never adequately explained why it was Arwen instead of Glorfindel at the Ford in the movie (of course, PJ&Co. wanted to increase her screen-time and show she can hold her own). I must say I really enjoyed the explanation you came up with. It does tie up those loose corners left from the film.

Your depiction of Arwen as not being an eager swordswoman, preferring not to deal with weapons and doing so out of necessity is quite beautiful. Her decision to help, for Aragorn's sake rather than her want to prove herself, is utterly believable and realistic. More importantly, you showed that there will be consequences following her deed, and that is the fact I appreciate most. Not least, showing that it was mostly with Elrond's help that the river rose, was an extremely wonderful nod to the book, serving as a reminder that Arwen is indeed not as powerful as her father or Glorfindel

And that last sentence was pure brilliance. It was good to see Arwen recognise that Glorfindel can be terrible.

Just one tiny slip-up I caught: 'Arathon' (lacks an 'r').

Certh
LalaithElerrina chapter 1 . 5/15/2013
This was an exceptional piece of work. I find it very believable to have Arwen take Glorfindel's place in this way.

When I first saw the movies, I liked that Arwen was more active, but then as I thought about it more and more, I found myself thinking, what sort of man was Elrond, to send his DAUGHTER out to save this Hobbit, and potentially face these ringwraiths? Is every single male in Rivendell this pathetically incompetent that Arwen could do the job better than every single one of them?

It would be logical that Elrond would send the very best person for the job, regardless, because it's that important. After all, he let his sons go to a very scary dangerous place rescue their mom. But is Arwen really better, faster, more skilled at riding than they and every other person in Rivendell? Really? REALLY? So that started bugging me.

But this, however, helps to alleviate that concern and explain in a way that I find plausible, Arwen's involvement in the Flight to the Ford.

Very well done. At the end, I grinned. I can relate. Arwen's attitude seemed to be 'It's better to ask forgiveness than permission,' but I think her dad will make things very unpleasant for her now, and so will Glorfindel. I'm glad it's her and not me.