Reviews for Why the most feminist heroine in YA lit is also the most feminine
TLWtlw chapter 1 . 8/29/2014
Don't you mean she killed Coin, not Snow?
ColMikeFuser chapter 1 . 3/1/2014
"Sing, goddess, the anger of Achilles", begins Homer's "Iliad", to establish the Neoclassical tradition of sacrificing the many to the Victor, then celebrating the Victor's triumph overtly, while covertly feeling relief that we have sufficiently kissed the Victor's arse, to escape our own death at his hands.

Fitting that those readers of the Collins trilogy, who believe Panem to be the last band of humans alive, have a heroine to celebrate, for demolishing the entire structure of oppression that commenced with the Sack of Troy, continued through Imperial Rome, and concluded with the fall of Panem’s Snow regime.

There is an enormous epistemological gap, between the sycophant who congratulates Hitler for invading Czechoslovakia while anxiously asking the Fuhrer if he intends to conquer anyone else, and Katniss Everdeen's blunt and candid question put to Coriolanus Snow, "Why don't you just kill me now?". The cowardly approach to the bully,both offering to pretend the bully not to be what he is, and offering to believe the lie as well, makes the coward both a fool and an accomplice.

Katniss Everdeen refuses to be either fool or accomplice. Snow finds this quality refreshing. So much so, that he toys with her, as might a cat toss a wounded animal before devouring it. Had she been schooled in the fine art of diplomacy, she would be far less compelling a heroine and certainly not a role model. She's much more William Tell than George S Patton. She fights for her family because she loves them unconditionally...her politics are purely reactive, not power-seeking. Her countrymen are the better for her efforts but she sees no glory in it, only her failure to protect sister Prim. The existence of her story, were it an actual history and not a work of fiction, could be understood as a kind of adoption of the people she saved, into her extended family and care, and her decision to risk having children, a recognition that her new family, the tribe of the Panemites, made for a safe place to rear children.

Katniss Everdeen is an admirable human being, albeit a fictional one. She represents what we should be.

In the end, our feelings and our empathy are of little consequence. Caesar Flickerman displayed an abundance of feeling, on his Capitol TV broadcasts, but was nothing more than an enabler of tyranny.

Katniss Everdeen does not merely feel. She takes action. And it is the story of her actions that have meaning.
fyrebirdrises chapter 1 . 12/21/2013
Very nicely pulled together. I've had similar thoughts floating around in my head ever since I saw the article drifting around about Peeta as the stereotypical movie girlfriend. I agreed with much of what it said, while still feeling that he is undeniably male.

One of the things I enjoy about this series is how it stretches gender roles without ignoring them.
TitanNegro chapter 1 . 9/23/2013
That's why she is not only my favorite female character,but probably my 3rd favorite fictional character EVER
Phoenix Refrain chapter 1 . 9/7/2013
The final act of assassinating Snow is an act of intense protection for the future children of Panem by ensuring that the Hunger Games would not take place again.

I think you meant Coin?

I read this out loud to hubs as I read it (we're both English Majors) and this is a very fine and concise piece of literature. It makes the point and supports it without going overboard.

Also, you've not inspired another one of my pieces for 13 Weeks of Rebellion! MUST TYPE NOW
TiffOdair chapter 1 . 8/31/2013
Wow i can tell you are wonderful in english. I liked it
Guest chapter 1 . 8/31/2013
I enjoyed reading your essay. I liked your prospective and analysis on the type of character Katniss Everdeen is. Thanks for posting!
SoThere chapter 1 . 8/31/2013
Excellent analysis. I feel like I'm back in college. :)
sexymarauders chapter 1 . 8/31/2013
Ohmygodness! This was great! Loved the comparison to the Odyssey :) was this for English class, or just for fun? I would love to talk about literature with you some time :)