"'To be or not to be,' that is the question. Shakespeare was always writing little riddles for us to find and figure out." The professor reached up with his pointer, pushing his glasses up the bridge of his nose. "So, students, I'd like for you to…"

It all trailed off, the boy sitting on the edge of the group of students, being a typical loner, a few desks separating him from the rest. Dark eyes shut for a while and he took a deep breath before opening again. Only, when he did, the professor was staring at him, as the rest of the class.

"W-what?" He asked hesitantly. As soon as the words left his lips, the others in his literature class burst out into hoots and hollers, laughing.

"Seth, try to pay attention, okay?" The professor said to him with a small nod and smile, starting back up on the lesson. Eyes darted up to the clock, watching the thin hand tick through the minutes. Soon enough, the sound of rustling clothing and papers as well as the sound of chairs scraping across the floor and banging into the desk drew Seth's attention back to the present.

Just as the boy in the dark clothing turned to exit the rom, the professor's voice ran across the hall. "Seth could you come down here, please?" Seth turned from the door and went back down the ramp, sighing in irritation as he stood before the teacher.

"I've noticed you've seemed more… distracted and distant, lately, Seth. Is everything alright? Nothing bothering you at all? The older man asked, concern in his gray hues as he kept them focused on the young male's face.

"I'm fine, Mr. Garrett, don't worry," And with that, Seth turned from the man and walked back up, toting his bag with him before Mr. Garrett called up to him again.

"Be sure of it, son, be sure of it!" And then the doors slammed shut behind him, leaving the professor to be all on his lonesome. Seth hurried and marched across the campus, autumn birds singing happily in the changing branches of the trees, only silencing when the male walked past. He kept his eyes low, giggling girls not even drawing his attention as they sunbathed in their undergarments.

Nearing the River Hall, he stopped and picked his head up, glancing around to see who was around. With no one there, instead of darting inside, he made a beeline for the shady backside of the building, facing the river which emptied itself into the belly of the lake. The boy crouched down in the shade, face in his hands while his books laid on the damp ground. Breathing jagged, he did his best to calm down, control himself. Control his fear. Seth would soon stand back up, eyes red from the tears of his panic attack and his gaze flickered to a tree where the movement caught it his eye.

"Shoo!" He yelled, throwing his hands up and a large black raven swooped down, feet grasping for the boy. He ducked and the great bird flew off, leaving one feather laying on the ground next to his feet. His dark brown eyes fell onto the feather before sneering at it. He lifted one converse clad shoe, stepping on the feather and crushing it into the mud before bending down and grabbing his books.

He darted inside of the River Hall, stomping his feet on the mat at the front of the door to rid himself of any mud he might track into the dorm hall he lived in before zooming upstairs and into his room. The large oak door shut behind Seth, books were thrown onto the futon and he plopped down into his desk chair. He had no roommate in this co-ed building. It was surprising, wouldn't someone, guy or girl, be wound up with him? Shrugging at his thoughts, the boy reached down and clicked the computer on, the hum filling the space and the screen lit up.

Slender digits would brush the keys, typing in the assignment that Mr. Garrett had given the class. He looked up a few of Shakespeare's most famous sonnets and playwrights, scanning over a few of them. He came to Sonnet XVIII, tilting his head as he began to read the words, mumbling them himself.

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot for the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed,
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or natures changing course untrimmed:
By thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, ad this gives life to thee.

It was astonishing, he though. What a sickening love one felt for this woman, or even boy. He snickered to himself. The men in that era were sickening, treating boys like women just because their voices were higher. Seth's lips curled up in a sneer and he flipped his hair back from his eyes before beginning to write down what he thought of the sonnet by William Shakespeare. The paper he'd written was a good two and a half pages long. Not too shabby for someone who was utterly bored with this assignment and didn't want to do it.

A few rasps on the door of his room sounded and he stood, turning as his paper printed and opened the door, a male, about the same height as him with black hair, violet tinting it almost like a raven's feather. His eyes were eerie too. Coal black and barely showing the white.
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"Seth, this is going to be your roommate, his name is Lucas. Lucas Ravenfellow." Said the dorm administrator, trying to shove the dainty fellow into the small room with Seth. "This is Seth Clarkston, please, try to behave and get along… We have no other spare rooms for either of you." The chubby man then turned and walked away, his beady eyes following the other students.

"Kind of a creep, isn't he?" A small voice came from this new boy and Seth's eyes flickered too him.

"Oh just shut up and unpack." He snapped and collected his stuff again, clicking off the computer and locking it up. "I need to get to class, so don't mess with my stuff." The dark haired child hurried out of the room, rushing towards his next class so he didn't see the smirk form on his new roommate's lips.