Disclaimer: I don't own 'Avatar: The Last Airbender'
Title: Aquifer
Rating: K+ (PG)
Categories:
Romance
Summary:
Haru had told her that he would do anything for her. He was her support, her rock. And she was his life, his water.
Pairings: Haru x Katara (Karu)
Word Count: 589
Notes:
An aquifer is a layer of porous rock that can hold and transmit water. When I read this definition, I instantly thought of Haru and Katara.

Very fluffy. Too fluffy. Oh well.


AQUIFER

Haru had told Katara that he would do anything for her. He was her support, her rock. And she was his life, his water.
(Haru x Katara)

Flowerperson
© 2006


Aquifer: A layer of porous rock that can hold and transmit water.

Placing a brown blanket around Katara's shoulders, Haru sits beside her in front of the burning campfire. She murmurs a 'thank you' and he smiles as a response. She thinks that she likes it when he smiles, but doesn't say anything lest she embarrass herself.

The fire is beginning to die out, so he throws more dry wood onto it, feeding the embers. He notices the dark bags under her cerulean eyes and questions her on it.

It's nothing, she insists; the long journey was just taking its toll on her. They have been traveling for five days straight on foot since Appa—their flying bison—was injured. They had encountered Haru and his father's resistance group (made up of mostly earthbenders) in a forest around a day's walk from Omashu.

After an awkward silence, he comments that her brother and friend had been gone a long time, and she hums in agreement.

Haru still doesn't believe her earlier excuses so pushes her (it was very unlike the boy she remembered all those months ago). Finally relenting, she explains that she had been having nightmares. It was like... premonitions but she hopes they aren't. She doesn't want her dreams to come true.

Don't ask me to repeat them, she begs as she stares at the sky. She doesn't think she could bear remembering the images. The pain, the burning,the death.

Katara is supposed to be an optimist but recently all she has been dwelling on was pessimism. She wonders if she is becoming like Sokka, and lets loose a nervous chuckle. It is a pathetic attempt to lighten the situation, and it only makes her feel worse.

She is meant to be Aang and Sokka's support, but she couldn't do it anymore. She isn't strong or sturdy enough. She is the water; it was not solid. She is the ice; it was too slippery.

But I'm the rock, Haru reminds her. He could be the support—that, after all, is his element—and help her help her accomplices. He is strong enough; sturdy enough; solid enough. He will not let her or her friends fall.

Glancing to him, Katara realizes how Haru really is a nice guy. She should thank him—show him her gratitude. She goes to peck his cheek but he turns to her and instead of her lips coming in contact with his cheek, they meet his own lips.

The 'kiss' is awkward, accidental and unintentional but soon—when he places his hand on the small of her back—it is sweet, gentle and everything she expects Haru's kiss to be. They separate soon after, both blushing and looking everywhere but each other.

They apologize at the same time, and it only makes their cheeks redden more. Hesitantly, they exchange flushed looks before focusing on each other's lips.

The second kiss is on purpose, but shorter as a certain water-tribe warrior saunters into the camp, groaning about his empty stomach. When he sees the two in a lip-lock, he instantly wields his boomerang and charges towards Haru.

He dodges Sokka's attack and ignores his death threats, saying goodbye to Katara (and Aang, who walks in with a confused expression). Haru promises to be back tomorrow and accompany them into Omashu.

Sokka spent the rest of the night berating Katara, but she pays less attention to him than Haru did. Sighing, she snuggles into her sleeping bag and dreams of optimism.

He is her rock—her support.

And she is his water—his life.