Prologue

An LCD projector hummed to life in a dark room, with several people sitting in the shadows. The first slide projected onto the wall read, "International Genetics Technologies Inc.- Sorna Project.'

One of the people in the room got up and sat down in front of a laptop, clearing his throat. He tapped several keys, entering a few commands, and the slide changed, showing what seemed to be a green and brown splotch of color with blue lines running through it. The man spoke, as text appeared at the bottom of the screen, "Isla Sorna. A volcanic island 80 miles west from the Costa Rican coast. Off-limit to the public, but entry is allowed for employees of a German mining company, Kaufman Mining Inc., which is licensed to mine various metals from the volcanic regions of the island. Our aerial photographs, however, show us other things…"

The slide changed again, this time showing four aerial photos of what looked like clusters of buildings. The man continued, "Our aerial survey team took these shots when flying over Isla Sorna. The buildings were not registered under Kaufman Mining Inc., but were illegally built 10 years ago."

At the words, 'Ten years ago,' a few people in the room sat up straight. The buildings were built at the same time, then… The man changed the slide again, this time showing a gigantic dome, which looked like an assembly of metal struts that had mesh fixed inside. The man controlling the slides spoke, "The structure you see on screen is what we presume to be a cage. This cage is 250 meters in diameter, and is 80 meters high. But our ground survey teams discovered that the cage has, at round level, a bowl-shaped depression in the ground, estimated to be 150 meters in diameter and 30 meters deep. The depression also had some water in it. The depression was built out of concrete, and the water was similar to that of a meromictic lake, with freshwater at the surface and denser saline water at the deeper regions. Various fish were seen, and the deeper parts of the pond were not fully investigated, due to loss of contact with our ground survey team."

One of the people watching the slideshow spoke up, "Why was contact lost with the ground survey team?"

The slideshow controller replied, "We do not know, but this was their last recorded video feed." Saying thus, he brought up a different screen, which showed a static-filled image of ferns, plants, and trees in what seemed to be a jungle. The round pond was in front of the recording device, and true enough, several fish were darting around in the pond. A voice, sounding scratchy due to the long distance communication, was heard saying, "Fish have been identified as freshwater fish, and our divers have certified that the deeper waters are saline. They have not returned from their second round of diving yet…"

Suddenly, the recording device was jerked around violently, hitting several trees and finally falling onto the ground, where it now recorded the gnarled buttress roots of a tree. The sounds that it recorded, however, were disturbing. Fearsome screams were heard, together with loud flapping noises, as well as several gunshots, and loud, ear-piercing screeching that couldn't have been made by humans. Soon, the forest became silent, the only noises heard being those of crickets and birds. The video continued to show the tree's buttress roots, until the camcorder was suddenly turned off. The slideshow controller exited the screen, saying, "The survey team only got footage up to their exploration of the cage, where the communications blackout occurred."

"We did, however, receive this footage as well," the slideshow controller said, bringing up a new screen. As soon as the footage started playing, several gasps were heard. For the recording showed a herd of sauropod dinosaurs drinking and lounging in a lake, with a herd of parasaurolophosaurs drinking and bathing in the same lake. The next recorded images also showed some dinosaurs. A tyrannosaur, recorded from behind as it walked toward a herd of gallimimus. A herd of pachycephalosaurs, peacefully grazing. Some triceratops, locking horns and grunting loudly. And the last recorded image showed something that made the people in the room cringe in their seats, as it showed a lone, juvenile maiasaur being torn apart by a pack of velociraptors.

The light was turned on and the slideshow stopped. Peter Ludlow, InGen's newest CEO, stood up and asked a woman near the laptop, "How many species are on Site B?"

The woman took out her Palm Pilot and consulted it for some time. Finally, she replied, "42 species, sir. All 42 species' embryos are stored in a fortified, still-running cryogenic laboratory chamber. Of the 42, only 15 are stored in our vaults at Palo Alto."

"Which species are those?" Ludlow asked, snatching her Palm Pilot from her and looking at the screen, which showed a list of dinosaur names. The list read,

Species Stored At InGen HQ, PA, CA.

Tyrannosaurus Rex

Othnielia

Hypsilophodontid

Maiasaura

Dilophosaurus

Pterodactyl

Stegosaurus

Euplocephalus

Procompsognathus

Velociraptor

Triceratops

Microceratops

Apatosaurus

Styracosaurus

Hadrosaurus

Ludlow finished reading that, and selected the touch screen icon labeled as 'Sorna Species'. It read:

Species Stored At Site B Facility.

Tyrannosaurus Rex

Othnielia

Hypsilophodontid

Maiasaura

Dilophosaurus

Pterodactyl

Stegosaurus

Euplocephalus

Procompsognathus

Velociraptor

Triceratops

Microceratops

Apatosaurus

Styracosaurus

Hadrosaurus

Deinonychus

Carnotaurus

Pachycephalosaurus

Ankylosaurus

Gallimimus

Suchomimus

Therizinosaurus

Gastonia

Amargasaurus

Mamenchisaurus

Brachiosaurus

Plesiosaurus

Sauroposeidon

Kronosaurus

Spinosaurus

Allosaurus

Dimetrodon

Metriacanthosaurus

Parasaurolophus

Utahraptor

Coelophysis

Herrerasaurus

Stygimoloch

Baryonyx

Gojirasaurus

Trilobite (Non-dinosaurian)

Ammonite (Cephalopod)

Ludlow handed her back the Pilot, saying, "We've struck Gold, Laura. Gold that will pull us away from Chapter 11. Prep the team. We leave by tomorrow."