Wow. That's all I can say. It has been an amazing... how many months? Seven? Seven months and this story is over. This is the longest story I've ever written. I want to thank all of you who read and reviewed. It really means a lot to me. You are all awesome and deserve your own Danny Phantom!

If that was possible, I would give you him, but, unfortunately, it is not.

Thanks again! I'll be back with a sequel eventually! Look for me! I love you all!

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

Disclaimer: Danny Phantom is not mine. However, the story and the idea for the story is, so no stealing!

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Maddie opened her eyes, only to see bright teal ones looking worriedly back at her.

"Mom?' Jazz asked.

Maddie sat up in a flash, looking around.

"Why are all of you here?" she exclaimed. "Why aren't you out there, fighting?"

"The battle's over," Tucker said.

"We won?" Maddie whispered.

Everyone nodded solemnly.

Maddie broke out into a smile. "That's great!" Her smile faded when she saw everyone's sad faces. Jazz, Sam, Valerie, and Tucker's eyes were red and puffy from hours of crying. Paulina and Dash stood to the side, tears streaming down their faces.

"What happened?" Maddie asked. "Where's Jack and Danny?"

Tears came to Jazz's eyes. Sam whimpered.

"Dad's dead…" Jazz said quietly. "Vlad killed him."

Maddie's brain fought to process this information. Jack Timothy Fenton, the love of her life, dead? Even worse, killed? By Vlad Masters, his best friend? Tears began to stream down her face.

"And Danny?" Maddie asked, praying.

Everyone looked at each other.

"Danny's gone…" Jazz whispered. "He just… sort of…"

"Sort of, what?"

Jazz told her mother what had happened; how Danny had sacrificed himself to save the ones he cared about. How, in the end, he had just disappeared.

Maddie made a sound and Jazz hugged her, sobs racking both their bodies. Tucker, Sam, and Valerie, joined shortly by Dash and Paulina, cried silently, trying, unsuccessfully to comfort each other.

They cried well into the night.

The next day, they mouned. They mourned, and they started to rebuild. The town needed fixing up. People needed to be buried. Ghosts needed to get back to the Ghost Zone.

Life needed to go on.

But, as the years went by, nobody forgot. Nobody forgot the boy with ghost powers. Nobody forgot the heart he had. Nobody forgot how he had sacrificed his life, to save the ones he loved. The years turned to decades, the decades to centuries. One century turned to two, and two to five. And nobody forgot the boy…

Danny Phantom: The boy, the myth, the legend.

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"And that, my friends, is the story of Danny Phantom," the old woman said to her audience of children.

They were all wide-eyed, stock still, staring at the old woman. She had long silver hair, teal eyes, and a square face. Her skin was slightly darker than every one else's.

She smiled. "I think you had all be getting home," she said with a chuckle.

The children all scat, leaving the library in a flash. The woman smiled and moved her wheelchair around, facing the portrait of the subject of her story… and her thoughts. Then she heard something behind her.

She whipped around as fast as her wheelchair would allow. There, standing in the middle of the floor and looking quite out of place, was a small little girl. She had long black hair and bright blue eyes.

"Destiny?" the woman asked.

"Mrs. Baxter, I have a question," the little girl said.

"Go ahead," Mrs. Baxter said.

"How do you know that story?"

Mrs. Baxter smiled. "Come here, child," she said.

Destiny walked up to the old woman who she scooped her up on her lap.

"You see," Mrs. Baxter said. "My mother and father were there. And they told his story to their children, who told it their children, who told it to their grandchildren, who told it to me."

"So, your parents were there when it happened?" Destiny asked.

"Yes. As a matter of fact," Mrs. Baxter said, "they knew Danny."

Destiny thought for a moment. "Your great-great-great-great-grandparents were Dash and Paulina," she said.

Mrs. Baxter nodded. "Indeed they were."

"Do you know what happened to the others?" Destiny asked.

"I do," Mrs. Baxter said. "Maddie soon died of a broken heart. She just couldn't live without her husband; it was like a part of her was missing. Jazz grew older and became the world's best ghost fighter. Next to Danny of course," Mrs. Baxter added. "Sam and Tucker became scientists. They tried to find what may have actually caused Danny to become half ghost in the first place."

"Did they find it?" Destiny asked.

"I'm afraid not," Mrs. Baxter said. "Their research is still going on today, five centuries later. As for Valerie, she helped protect the town from ghosts."

"What about the other ghosts? The ones that helped Danny?"

"No one knows," Mrs. Baxter said. "They disappeared the day Danny did."

"Oh," Destiny said. "Are you sure that that story is true?"

Mrs. Baxter looked at Destiny. "Of course it is," she said. "Why would you ask that, after all the questions you just proposed to me?"

Destiny shrugged. "I really should get going," she said, hopping off the old woman's knee. "Thanks for the story."

Mrs. Baxter watched the small girl exit the library. She turned to the portrait of Danny Phantom.

"Your story is getting harder and harder for people to believe," she said.

Green orbs stared silently back at her.

"I just wish there was some way for them to believe,' she said.

A soft burst of wind banged the window open. It drifted over to Mrs. Baxter and caressed her face gently. She smiled, comforted. Then, as soon as it had come, it was gone through the open library doors.

It swept across the street towards Destiny, who was slowly walking home, doubting what the old woman had said.

The wind swept gently across the girls face. She stopped.

"Who's there?" she asked, turning around. But there was nothing. Shrugging, she continued.

But the wind would not be denied. It went over to the girl again, this time ruffling up her hair.

"What do you want?" Destiny yelled, close to tears. "I have no money!"

The wind gently caressed her face, as he had done to the old woman. Her eyes widened.

"Danny?" she asked quietly. "Danny Phantom?"

The wind seemed to be happy, as it caressed her face more.

"The story really is real!" Destiny exclaimed happily. "I have to tell my friends!" she began to run off towards home, only to come to a halt. "But they'll never believe me," she said.

The wind seemed angry, ruffling her hair again.

"Okay, okay!" she said, fixing her hair. "But how do I get them to believe?"

The wind drifted over to her. And then it did something that both frightened and fascinated Destiny.

It spoke.

The wind spoke… and it said only four words, before leaving, never to be felt or seen, or heard for another hundred years:

"Not seeing is believing…"

THE END