A little boy covered his ears as he heard the screams of a woman.

He hated to hear his mother scream. Though he was too scared to move from where his mother put him and instructed him to stay.

Safe.

Safe like he wanted to be, how he wanted his mother to be.

He watched as his mother fought off the skinny man who was threatening her for interrupting something important.

His mother was bravely shoving the man away, hollering at him, like a mother bird does to something approaching her nest. She was trying to scare him away, bravely protecting the child that was unbeknown to the angry man.

The man was tall, skinny and struck fear in the heart of this little boy who hid under a table in a small restaurant.

Suddenly the man smiled.

The boy trembled with fear of what was going to happen. He feared for himself, he feared most of all for his mother, who was in the midst of the grinning man's intentions.

The boy hid close to the door where the man was exiting with the same wild stare, the stare of a killer. The man barely glanced at the tablecloth that the boy clung to like a safety blanket.

The boy was shivering, and he couldn't stop, he couldn't pass the feeling like something bad was going to happen.

The man mumbled something about "following you home", but it was not meant for anyone to hear but himself.

The boy watched as the man faded into the busy sidewalk.

A soft whimper came from the boy. The woman that seemed mean and cold to the tall man, softened, and picked up the wincing boy who was no older than six, cradling him in her arms.

"It's all over. The bad man left. The bad man is gone now, gone forever. It's okay." Whispered the mother, still cradling him. His trembling slowed in her comforting embrace, they went to her car and she gently strapped the little child in.

Still, the child felt terrified for the long night ahead, he wished that an event like that had not happened.

Then, slowly, like his wish came true, the fresh memory was washed away like the beginning blur of the car window. He was lulled to sleep by the classical tune softly hummed by his mother.

They drove away, as the tall figure smiled and watched from an alleyway, holding glinting blades in each hand.

The sun slipped under the horizon in the vast city that fifteen years later, the same little boy called home.

And Johnny watched the sunset comfortably from his rooftop, sweetly singing a classical song for only himself to hear.