Thunderbirds II: "Thunderbirds Are Go!"

Adapted by William Raymer

Adapted from the United Artists/Century 21 Cinema motion picture Thunderbirds Are Go!

Written by Gerry and Sylvia Anderson

and the Universal Pictures/StudioCanal motion picture Thunderbirds

Screenplay by William Osbourne and Michael McCullers

Story by Peter Hewitt and William Osbourne

Historian's Notes:

While adapted from the first of the two motion pictures based on the 1960s Thunderbirds television series, this story takes place in the "MovieVerse"-that is, the continuity established in the 2004 Universal Pictures motion picture Thunderbirds

This story takes place five years after the 2004 motion picture Thunderbirds, which puts this story in the year 2015.

PROLOGUE

On May the fourth, 2013, the Martian Exploration Center at Glenn Field, Virginia, attempted to launch Zero-X, a revolutionary new spacecraft, on a mission to Mars. However, shortly after take-off, the ship's elevator controls began to jam, causing the ship to lose altitude. All the crew of Zero-X were able to eject before the ship crashed into the Atlantic Ocean.

Two years later, the M.E.C.'s investigators completed a 862-page report on the events of the crash. At a conference to analyze the report, Colonel Robert Stewart asked those gathered if he had their confidence on the report's findings of sabotage. All present gave their full support.

Then, Colonel Stewart asked for their support on a second launch attempt. All save one gave their support. The lone dissenter, Zero-X Captain Paul Travers, said "I believe our security arrangements are inadequate. Therefore, I suggest that we ask International Rescue to be present at the next launch attempt."

Stewart grew incensed at the statement by Travers. "Are you suggesting, sir, that we are incapable of handling our own security arrangements?" Travers smiled, then retorted with "I have 862 pages here, sir, which say just that."

And so, Colonel Stewart advised President Obama to ask for the help of International Rescue in securing the next Zero-X launch attempt.

Halfway around the world, Alan Tracy and his girlfriend, Tin-Tin Belagant, were watching the sun rise over Tracy Island when Alan's communicator beeped. "Father wants me," Alan said. "See you later," Tin-Tin said before she and Alan kissed.

Once four of the five Tracy brothers were gathered in the study of their father, billionaire ex-astronaut Jeff Tracy, the meeting began. "Well, Father, the take-off is scheduled for tomorrow morning," Scott said. "You'll have to make a decision soon, Dad," Alan said. "Even if it's no," Gordon said.

"This is a tough one," Jeff said. "I know how you boys feel. I guess you're raring to go. But, as you know, we have a strict rule here: No International Rescue craft is to be launched unless someone is in grave danger. However, rules were made to be broken."

Jeff stood from his desk. "Now here's what we'll do. Scott, launch Thunderbird 1, proceed to Glenn Field and stand by there for the take-off of Zero-X." "Yes, sir," Scott said.

Jeff turned to Virgil. "Virgil, launch Thunderbird 2 and follow Scott to Glenn Field. When Zero-X takes off, escort it through the atmosphere on the first part of its journey." "Yes, sir," Virgil said.

Alan looked at Jeff. "Father, can I..." "Yes, you can," Jeff interrupted. "Launch Thunderbird 3 and orbit the Earth until Zero-X has established its course to Mars." "Thanks, Dad," Alan said.

Gordon turned to Jeff. "What about me, Father?" he asked. "Well, it's unlikely that you'll be needed in Thunderbird 4, but you'd better be ready, just in case," Jeff said. "Yes, sir," Gordon said, sadly.

"Okay, boys," Jeff said. "Thunderbirds are go!"

The mission begins next time.