Another silly, meaningless earth saying involves the assertion that people can "fall" into love. The difficulty here is that falling implies something inevitable, something outside the conscious control of those involved. This comparison simply does not apply. There has never been a case where someone was forced into the condition of love. Forced into a relationship, perhaps, that may have resulted in amorous feelings, but never forced into the emotion itself. You can push someone off a cliff, but you can't really push them into a willing embrace with another person. I mean, the willing part sort of negates all that in the first place, doesn't it?

Will.

Humans tend to prattle on about free will, especially with regard to people using it to go against societal norms. As if that's a bad thing. As if societal norms, morals, what have you, aren't just stupid human created concepts in the first place. Really, it's a very Earth-centric view; not at all politically correct. It's the nature of time and the universe and multiple universe theory and Schrödinger kittens and, well, everything that was and everything that ever will be, to have options. Options are something you get a feeling for if you can see all the different possibilities spiralling outward in a giant, chaotic pinwheel of potentiality from every moment of existence. And options, of course, imply choices.

Look, if you've got three-quarters of an hour for lunch and you're in the middle of London, circa early twenty-first century, and you've got a tenner in your pocket and there's a fish and chips shop right across from a pub, and yeah, you like chips, but you could really go for a ploughman's, but maybe that'll take too long and you'll be late getting back to your cramped little cubicle, though you'd really rather be just about anywhere else, but you've got to make a decision fast or you'll have wasted too much time and the choice will have been made for you, which really means that you've made a choice anyways, and…oh, hang it. The point is, every moment there's a choice. Every moment, there's a distinct possibility that where your life was headed to when you dragged your sorry frame out of bed that morning is nowhere near where it's going to end up that evening when you lay down to sleep. Maybe, it's as simple as choosing chips over a ploughman's, and maybe you get run over by a reckless lorry driver on your way across the street. Choices. Possibilities. Options. Free will.

There's nothing accidental or inevitable about it. You can jump off that cliff. You can tarry too long near the edge (even though you know it's dangerous) until the darn thing collapses beneath you. You can let go the stranglehold you have on the edge because you're just too tired to hold yourself up anymore. But you don't just fall off.

Now, here's the kernel of truth.

Once you take that step, once you find yourself suspended over the great, vast, unknowable emotion that is love, there really isn't any going back. Time doesn't work that way. The universe doesn't work that way. Hell, gravity doesn't work that way, and isn't it gravity what started this whole silly comparison in the first place? You've made your choice, let yourself go, and the once just possible outcome is now as inevitable as that hard jolt at the bottom (though considerably more pleasant, or so Jack would lead one to believe). There's no falling in love, but there's no stopping it once you're engaged (in the process, not literally engaged, like with a ring and all, strange Earth custom that, as if a jumped up piece of carbon is going to make any sort of difference in the course of someone's affections). It's inexorable. Incontrovertible. One of the great, mysterious forces of the universe. So humans don't exactly have it all wrong, just messed up a tad. Failing of their species.

Really, humans, they're not half bad.