Title: The Wombat Series
Chapter: Four: Thanksgiving
Pairing: House/Wilson, microscopic mentions of House/Stacy, Wilson/Amber.
Rating: G for total fluff.
Warning(s): Totally AU: a kid!fic where the Ducklings are House & Wilson's kids. Chapter Three/Four: slight mentions of House's dysfunctional family, general backgrounds.
Disclaimer: House, Wilson, Cuddy & respective ducklings are not mine. I wish, but alas, they aren't.
Author's Note: This installment is back on track with chronological order. ^_^

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Thanksgiving had always been small and rather dreaded for House when he was young. Usually it had been just him, his mother, his father and maybe his grandmother if she decided to grace them with her presence that particular year. Things didn't change much as the years went by. His grandmother had passed when he was a freshman in high school, but she was never a permanent fixture in the holiday's celebrations. Up until his second year of fellowship, his holiday consisted of his mother and father, a mediocre turkey, varying vegetables of the winter variety, and a store-bought pumpkin pie. Dad passed out in his recliner after drinking too much Scotch and an all-together unpleasant "discussion" about how Gregory should grow up and attempt to be vaguely successful. Once the man started snoring along to the football game on the television, Greg would kiss his mother goodbye, grab his coat and take his leave. All things considered, the holiday was never something to which he looked forward.

James' Thanksgiving experiences were the complete anti-thesis of how House knew the holiday. Of course, most of his experiences were total opposites, what with the nuclear family the Wilsons' had. The boys would play football out in the crisp New England air, even as he grew up. His mother would beckon them inside for a feast of decadent proportions: turkey, squash, sweet potato casserole, rolls, corn, gravy, mashed potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce, green bean casserole, and the list went on. The woman could feed an army, and there were just as many desserts and drinks to go around. House was in his glory the first time Wilson invited him over, back in the early years of their friendship.

Eventually, Thanksgiving no longer rested upon their mothers and fathers, but them instead. For House, he kept visiting family to a minimum, even when he was living with Stacy. It was much easier to stay in and drink while ignoring any holiday greetings. For Wilson, the holiday would often test whichever marriage he was in at the given time. Whether he had to impress the family, which he usually managed to do quite easily, or cook with his wives, there was still undue stress involved that resulted in some argument or another.

When the two men started to date, they made absolutely sure that whatever negative feelings were associated with the holiday would not enter their home. Wilson promised House that the phone would be off the hook, there would be no reason to visit any family because they were all that they needed. House, in turn, made no promises about the holiday being less stressful, but he made sure that there would be no testing involved whatsoever. After knowing each other for as long as they did, there was no reason to do any such thing.

Not long after, they started a family of their own. Robbie was the first child they had adopted, and the Thanksgiving was quite small at first. The Wombat was only two, so the concept of sitting around eating for prolonged periods of time held no excitement. It was like any other day at home, just with the traditional food of the season. Eric was their second child, and he was about the same age as Robbie.

The very first real Thanksgiving the four of them (and their Aunt Lisa) celebrated together was when the two boys were both five years old. Papa Wilson and Aunt Lisa made all of the food while Daddy House spent time with Robbie & Eric, who were fascinated with the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

However, being the good husband he was (and with promises of sufficient rewards later that night from Wilson), House took a few trips to the grocery store to pick up corn, and cranberry sauce ("The real kind, not the canned kind, House!"), and pumpkin spice ("Where in the hell do you expect me to find pumpkin spice?" "In the spice aisle?" "Well, where the hell is that?!") and about fifty other ingredients Wilson should have bought earlier in the week.

Once all of the cooking was finished, the family gathered together around a deep mahogany dining room table. House was reminded of the few times he stopped by the Wilson abode, but this time, it was his family. He looked over to his smiling husband, sitting directly across from him, then looked to his left to see the two boys wolfing down everything on their plate, and to his right to see Lisa giggling at the two boys. It was enough to make him feel warm and fuzzy on the inside (if he ever admitted to feeling that way, at least).

An hour and a half later, once the table was cleared, and everyone had eaten their fill, all five gathered on the couch to watch a movie. The two fathers were on either end of the couch, with the two boys next to them, and Aunt Lisa directly in the middle. All three adults sipped on mulled cider while Eric & Robbie drank apple juice. Papa Wilson made some caramel corn, which was being passed around, and all five were squished together. Despite the tight spaces, everyone was comfortable and content. None of them made it to the end of the movie, as they all were completely and totally content. It truly was a happy Thanksgiving.