***2010 Bronze PBA Award Winner: Tied With A General's Revenge For Best Story Based on an Episode***

WHAT IF....?

An alternate ending to: TWO NAZIS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE. Question: What would have happened if things had ended differently from the way they did in the original episode? I do not own Hogan's Heroes nor it's characters. I just enjoy watching them.

Kinch: "What's the good of staying? You couldn't tell Freitag about the Manhattan Project even if you wanted to."

Carter: "You don't even know what it is."

Hogan: "Well, whatever it is, Freitag knows too much. I'm going to see he never learns more about it."

Newkirk: "You don't mean you're going to...."

Hogan: "Tonight, when he comes to camp."

Kinch: "Suppose someone else has that information?"

Hogan: "No. Freitag's a loner. He's the only one who knows about the project and the tunnel. He's got to be liquidated."

(Scene from TWO NAZIS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE)


Hogan could feel the slight pressure of the gun in the inner jacket pocket of his brown bomber jacket pressing against him as he followed Schultz from the barracks to the steps of the Kommandant's office. Even though he didn't look around, he could feel the eyes of LeBeau, Carter, Kinch and Newkirk watching his back. They knew what he was planning to do would not only be the end of him in Stalag 13 as Senior POW officer, but as leader of their organization. Hogan put his foot on the bottom step of Klink's office. He touched the part of his jacket where the gun was, trying to feel it's presence in his pocket. He had to do this. He had to do this for his men. The fact that Gruppenfuhrer Freitag knew about his organization as well as the Manhattan Project mattered. Hogan couldn't allow Freitag to gain more information. He slowly put his foot on the next step of Klink's office.

God, I hope the men will get out after I've done what I have to do. I'm doing this for them. If I let Freitag live, he will come after my men. Hogan noticed Schultz holding open the door to Klink's office. Freitag has to die. Hogan smiled sadly. He knew he'd probably die today himself. Hochstetter was here in camp as well. And he would not take kindly to having his commanding officer murdered. But that's okay, Hogan thought to himself. If my death gives my men time to get away, I'd gladly sacrifice it. Taking a deep breath, he walked through the front door and into his place in history.

As Hogan entered the waiting room, he reached inside his bomber jacket, letting his fingers grip the weapon. He was beginning to perspire heavily under his clothes. He had killed before. But not like this. Not in cold blood. God, please give me the strength to do what must be done! He could feel his khaki shirt sticking to his body from the sweat. He reached for the doorknob of the door leading to Klink's inner office when it suddenly opened and he came face-to-face with Hochstetter. "Go right in, Colonel Hogan," he smirked. "Gruppenfuhrer Freitag is waiting."(1) Nodding, Hogan passed him as Hochstetter closed the door behind him. Hogan then saw Klink looking at him, nervously.

"Hogan, I know Freitag likes you. When you meet with him, please put in a good word for me." Hogan nodded as beads of sweat now broke out on his forehead. Klink opened the door to his inner office and allowed Hogan to enter. He then closed the door behind him, leaving the two men alone.

Freitag stood in front of the closed window in Klink's office. He had heard the door open and saw Hogan's reflection in the glass. he then raised the window slightly allowing the cool evening air to enter the room. Smiling cunningly, he then turned away from the window and looked at Hogan. "Well, Colonel Hogan," he said, "We meet again. I said I would see you later today." Freitag approached Klink's desk. "Please have a seat and let's begin with you telling me about the Manhattan Project."

"I'm afraid my plans have changed, sir," Hogan replied, pulling the gun from his pocket. He aimed it at Freitag. "I'm afraid you have to die. You already know about the tunnel and the Manhattan project. I can't risk you finding out more than what you already do. You have to be eliminated."

"Really?" Freitag didn't seem the least bit surprised at the gun in Hogan's hand. "You are a fool, Colonel Hogan. I'm offering you money and a way out of Germany. And you dare to pull a weapon on me? I could have you shot for this!"

"You seem to forget. I'm the one holding the weapon." Hogan walked around the room until he found himself near the open window. He glanced out and saw no-one. yet, something didn't feel right to Hogan. Something was definitely wrong. "Where is your aide, Manheim? I noticed he drove you here."

"I sent Manheim to park the car, Colonel Hogan," Freitag replied calmly. "He wanted to help me question you. But, Manheim is a fool and totally useless!"

Hogan, standing beside the open window, looked outside again. He still felt something was very wrong. He slowly looked around and suddenly gasped as the first bullet fired by a small weapon in Freitag's hand, struck him in his chest. Hogan clutched his chest as the blood spurted through his fingers. Hogan aimed his gun at Freitag's head, but before he could pull the trigger, Freitag fired again, striking Hogan in the chest again. Hogan stumbled as his gun hand began to shake. He fell to his knees as his own weapon fell from his hand. He looked up as Freitag now stood over him. "Did you really think I would allow you to kill me, Colonel Hogan? While it's true I wanted the information you have on the Manhattan Project, I was not willing to simply stand here and allow you to shoot me. Of course, I would have killed you anyway. Did you really think I would pay you fifty-thousand dollars and then let you live?"

Hogan, by now collasped to the floor, was laying on his back. So this is what dying is like, Hogan told himself. His final thoughts were of his men. They would mourn his passing for awhile. But they would survive. Freitag looked down and into Hogan's brown eyes. "It's a pity really, Colonel," he said. "You were not as smart as I gave you credit for despite the impressive things you were able to accomplish." He aimed his weapon at Hogan's head.

Just then, the door opened and Freitag'a aide, Manheim, entered. "What has happened?" he asked, taking in the sight before him. "Who shot Colonel Hogan?" he asked. Freitag smiled at him. "I'm afraid you did, Manheim. And now, I'm afraid I shall have to shoot you." With that, Freitag shot Manheim one time in the chest, killing him. He then took his own weapon and put it in Manheim's hand and took Manheim's weapon. He stood and sadly shook his head as the door to Klink's office opened again and Kink, followed by Hochstetter, his own weapon drawn, entered. Klink froze at what he saw.

"What's with all the shooting, Gruppenfuhrer?" Hochstetter asked, looking at his superior.

"A most unfortunate turn of events, Major Hochstetter," Freitag remarked. "Colonel Hogan came in here with a gun preparing to shoot me. My aide, Manheim, must've seen what was taking place from outside, and entered with his own weapon drawn. Colonel Hogan shot him in cold blood, but not before Manheim managed to fire twice, hitting Colonel Hogan both times. I'm afraid both men are dead."

Hochstetter knelt beside Hogan and pressed two fingers against his neck. There was no pulse. Hochstetter reached over and closed Hogan's eyes. He then picked up Hogan's weapon and, looking at it, noticed that it hadn't been fired. He looked at his superior officer and stood up slowly. He tucked the weapon into his belt.

Unbeknownst to any of them, Kinch, Carter, LeBeau and Newkirk were standing outside the open window. Carter had tears running freely down his face. LeBeau bit his quivering lower lip and Kinch and Newkirk both fought to control their emotions. Even thought they knew the story Freitag had told was a total lie, they could do nothing about it. Hochstetter woud never be convinced otherwise, and considering his volatile history with Colonel Hogan, would cover Freitag's back. And Klink was totally useless.

"He murdered the Colonel!" whispered Newkirk, shock setting in. "He gunned him down in cold blood, Kinch."

Carter leaned against Kinch who wrapped his arms around the young sergeant's shoulders as Carter cried shamelessly. He could feel Carter's body shaking.

"But what can we do about it, Newkirk," Kinch replied, tears rolling down his cheeks. "Nobody will believe us. And the Colonel did go in there with a weapon."

"I'll show you what I'm gonna do about it, mate!" Newkirk replied as he pulled a pistol of his own from inside his blue RAF jacketjacket and, aiming through the open window, fired repeatedly. "Die you bloody bastard!" he yelled as shot after shot struck Freitag. He fired until his clip was empty. Then, Newkirk dropped the weapon and placed his hands atop his head as a means of surrendering. Hochstetter and several guards appeared from out of nowhere, guns drawn. Newkirk looked at the others. "I couldn't let the Colonel die for nothing," he said. "He deserved better than he got." He looked at Carter as Hochstetter clamped handcuffs on Newkirk's wrists. "Take care of Andrew for me, Kinch," he said. "there's nothing any of you can do for me now. LeBeau, don't worry about me. Help Kinch and Carter as much as possible. I'll be all right." Hochstetter yanked on the Englander's arm, leading Newkirk away. "Kinch, one last thing, mate."

"Yeah, Newkirk?" Kinch whispered, as his tears fell.

"Make sure you write to me mum, dad and sister and tell them what happened to me. And make sure when you write to Colonel Hogan's family, that you tell then what a great man he was, how much he was loved and respected by the men under his command. And that he was the best commanding officer a chap could have."

"I will, Newkirk. I promise." And then Newkirk was gone.

Kinch looked up at the heavens and sighed. He bit his lip. In one night, they had lost their commanding officer and one of their own.

"Don't worry, Newkirk," Kinch said in a taut voice, looking at the heavens. "I'll see that nobody forgets you or the Colonel and what both of you helped accomplish here, and the difference you both made."

(1) This sentence is from the original episode. Using it was not intentional, it's just that it seemed appropriate for purposes of the story.