Title: Guilt
Author: Simply Kelp
Opera: Don Giovanni
Pairing: Leporello/Giovanni
Rating: pg13 (implied sex)
Summary: To his recollection, Leporello has been the only individual capable of extracting that dread emotion from him. The man does it with such carelessness, that Giovanni is certain it is quite unintentional. Slash-ish. [Don Giovanni]
Disclaimer: Seeing as I'm not dead, I'm probably not Mozart, or da Ponte... but. who knows?
A/N: I was looking for something else, and stumbled across this on my computer. I don't think it matters too terribly much, but I was picturing Samuel Ramey, and Ferruccio Furlanetto as Giovanni and Leporello, respectively. If you get the opportunity, watch the 1989 von Karajan version (with Ramey, and Furlanetto), it's the best I've seen, and their chemistry is absolutely amazing.

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As a man of dubious moral compass, Don Giovanni ought never feel guilty. And indeed, he rarely does. To his recollection, Leporello has been the only individual capable of extracting that dread emotion from him. The man does it with such carelessness, that Giovanni is certain it is quite unintentional.

He ought to feel guilty when confronted with all of the women he has bedded. Their screaming, crying, and righteous indignation, however, seems exaggerated, and comical. In comparison, Leporello, with his quiet melancholy is minimal. But somehow, in a manner that Giovanni is completely puzzled by, Leporello is able to give a chance look, or a single word that will cause a whole plethora of emotion (which he is sure by normal standards would be quite modest, but being unaccustomed to such emotion, it seems an impossible amount) to flood through his body.

Giovanni knows that Leporello cares for him, and often uses it to his advantage. How else would one be convinced to stand for hours in the rain, and cold, distracting husbands, fathers, and fianc├ęs, while Giovanni is inside sating his lust. At times, they seem the perfect pair: a master, and his dog. But other times-- few, and far between them all-- Giovanni thinks that he ought to dismiss Leporello, so that he may work for a honourable noble instead. It would be quite devastating to his list, but at times he think he could endure that. Then, he realises how absurd he sounds, and orders Leporello to find him a maiden to deflower.

But every once in a while, between the taunts, and the jeers, Giovanni will throw some scrap of affection to Leporello. He ought not even do that, because it almost makes him feel more guilty to see Leporello's face begin to light up at the smallest vestige of a compliment. Usually, this prompts him to kick Leporello's feet from under him, or make a scathing remark about his lack of sexual conquests. Giovanni finds that it's much easier not to care for Leporello when he is on the ground, muttering ill assorted curses under his breath.

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Thank you for reading this, and I hope that you enjoyed it. I would love to hear what you thought!