years passed. and ever year, floods raged over the village. In the pouring rain, a voice cried out.
"MAMMA!!!"
Agwe heard it. it sounded so much like a voice from his past.
The child he had watched grown into a beautiful young girl, and now an old woman.
The 'mother' of the tribe, with no children of her own. Without thinking, he picked the little girl out of the flood.
"ASAKA! help me!!" he shouted. Asaka took the child and placed her in a tree.
"now what?" she asked, looking at the terrified child clinging to the branches.
Agwe grinned. "I have an idea."

"mamma, tell me the story again!" cried little Desiree.
"Oh, which one Ti moune?" Eurilie asked as she hung the clothes out. "The one about you and Tonton! the one where you saved him from the gods!"
Eurilie laughed, "Ti Moune! I didn't save him! Agwe blessed me and spared him."
"But I want to hear the story Mamma!"
"Alright, alright"

Eurilie wondered now, if she hadn't told the girl that story, if she hadn't filled her head with such nonsense about defying the gods,
they might all live through this. the storm raged outside the hut; Papa Ge wanted the boy who lay on Ti mounes mat.
perhaps he was going to take away her Julian, .
She looked over her daughters shoulder, looked down at the boy, and her mind took her back all the years. she could almost see young Julian laying there, and not a grand homme.
How could she she tell her daughter she was wrong?
how could this be happening again?

"I know he's there.... that's all I need to know."
Eurilie refused to let the tears come this time. She would never see her Ti Moune again. if she letter her go now, She would die.
But it had to be. She could not deny her daughter the chance to find him, to find the love she so desperately needed. She slipped off the shell from around her neck and slipped it around Ti mounes.
"Go and swim the sea... You know where we'll be, Ti moune."
They stared at each other for a moment, then Ti Moune threw herself into Eurilie's arms.
Her resolve to not cry broke as she held her daughter tightly for what she knew was the last time.