Disclaimer: Not mine.

Warning: This is yaoi.

Summary: Shiyuma is a family man. But he'd rather be out killing Soviets.


When he was twenty-five and his name was still Shima, he broke his first big case and the director promoted him.

This, of course, put him at imminent peril. Every single one of his coworkers turned against him, discreetly or not, and the knives came out. But Shima had long since known there wasn't really any such thing as cooperation or a reliable ally in a position such as the one he'd managed to get for himself, and he took the subsequent backstabbing and intrigues with a cool, level head and a calm, deliberate manner that impressed his superiors and got him another promotion before he was twenty-seven. Such was his performance that he was even made bureau chief of a very sensitive project, and Shima's name began to mean something in counterintelligence. Scuttlebutt was that he was even a candidate for a directorship, before the age of thirty, and possibly even an overseas assignment.

Then Shima found out that his wife of seven years was pregnant.

There was nothing else to be done. They had been struggling to conceive for five years—their parents were getting on, after all—and she'd suffered too many miscarriages to make an abortion even a remote possibility. Not that Shima wanted an abortion—he yearned to be a father just as much as his wife wanted to be a mother. The idea of a son growing in her womb made what he did next absurdly easy.

Shima resigned from his position as bureau chief and requested a transfer home.

It caused less of an uproar than he'd expected. The director was very understanding, and only mildly regretful that Shima's counterintelligence training would, after all, only be used in a supporting, rather sidelined role. There was always room in the organization for a man of Shima's particular skill set—it was simply understood that he would never, now, rise above the first tier.

Shima accepted this wholeheartedly, with such good humor and stoic acceptance that when the news got out that his wife was about to give him a son and that was why the rising star of Counterintelligence was, in effect, committing career suicide, even his former enemies at the office clapped him on the back and bought him a drink.

It was nearly eight weeks before Shima's wife was due that the leak was discovered. Someone in the deepest levels of the agency had been caught selling information. No one knew who, but the director assured them that it was taken care of. There was only some clean-up to conclude, as not all of the stolen data had been recovered.

That was when Shima and his wife found themselves changing their names and relocating to a completely different part of Japan. The most difficult part was in being separated from their parents, but the agency assured them that after a few years, once the security issues were resolved, they would be able to visit. Shima was instructed to take up a job at a shell outfit being run as a paper company. He would still be counterintelligence, but as far as his neighbors were concerned, he was a salaryman.

So at the age of twenty-nine, Yoshikawa Shima became Kobayakawa Shiyuma and the father of a baby boy, born a month premature.

They named him Sena.

And despite the fact that Shima—now Shiyuma—had survived nearly ten years in the depths of a Japanese intelligence agency, despite the fact that he had survived North Korean spies, domestic terrorists, bringing down an Iraqi partisans' communications network, a security leak in his own bureau, and the Soviet Union, it was only then, when he was at the hospital beside his drowsing wife and holding his sleeping infant son in his arms, that Shiyuma felt, for the first time in his life, a chill of sheer terror raising the hair on the back of his neck.

Why does he look like this?