"For me the grief is still too near."

The hobbits absorbed the words and restrained themselves from pushing the elf into translating the words that rang in the air. Sam made an admirable attempt at saying a few words for Gandalf. He was very poetic, though he didn't seem too impressed with his efforts.

At least he was offering something, Gimli thought Legolas' lack of co-operation in their time of need was selfish of him as was his inconsiderate comment in the mines, "We should leave now."

Could the elf not see that he was grieving, that he was mourning for someone he was never going to see again – never even see the body of now that the mines where overrun with Goblins.

It was overly aggravating, "So much for the courtesy of the elves, singing in a language we don't understand about our friend. They are mocking us I swear!"

"Gimli, laments are always sung in elvish. It is tradition. As long as Gandalf can understand their words all of the hearts in the Golden Wood can be at peace. Please don't insult our ways."

"But we can't understand them, and we were closer to him than any of these elves were so I think we shouldn't be denied the right to pay our respects with them."

"My friend, Gandalf met these people thousands of years before you were born and in grieving and letting them grieve in their own ways, you are paying your respects to our old friend and showing him you care."

A grunt was the dwarf's only reply and the tension in the group was only thickening and so the elf decided to leave: he wanted the hobbits to relax and apparently that wasn't going to happen if he remained in the group.

...

All of the anger in Aragorn dissolved after reading the letter. Guilt filled its place along with fear: Legolas was seen as the eyes and ears of the Fellowship, the man on the front line and yet he was a child. He was somebody's child, someone's baby and the Elven Prince's innocence suddenly seemed so obvious.

He couldn't begin to imagine how confused his friend was: visions weren't common in Wood Elves so it wasn't something Legolas would have seen the effects of.

But Aragorn had lived in Rivendell, were visions are a much more common problem or sometimes an advantage. He needed to talk to Legolas. He needed to help him...

Estel arrived at camp to find his friend was missing. According to Gimli he was, "abandoning us for his own kind," a phrase that highlighted the fact that neither Gimli or the others knew of Legolas' situation, something he would have to sort out first...

...

"You shouldn't walk off on your own, mellon nin," it was Haldir, a friend that Legolas was more than happy to see.

The overly tight embrace received from his younger friend was concerning but Haldir just held him tighter – he had missed him so much.

On touching his friend, Legolas started to hear things:

"How is this possible?"
"Legolas, two already!"

"Pull them back!"

"Haldir!"

The Prince shivered in Haldir's arms and started to lean on him a lot more, "Mellon nin, are you ok?"

He could see elves firing from a high wall, the oncoming sea of... where they Orcs? No, they were much too big. These creatures were huge and they were coming in huge waves.

"Ladders!"

"Years ago we fought and died together."

"Fall back to the Keep!"

"Is this all you can conjure Saruman?"

The beasts jumped over the wall, dozens of elves were cut down in seconds.

He couldn't breathe, clinging to Haldir was all he could do. The older elf tried not to panic, but the violent shaking was almost mistaken for fitting. Seeing Legolas' horrified eyes stare at nothing was the only sign things were otherwise, "Legolas, talk to me mellon nin."

"Legolas! Kill him! Kill him!"

"Haldir!"

"Aragorn!"

There was an explosion. Aragorn fell and lay lifeless among the dead in front of the oncoming rush of creatures.

"Legolas say something!"

Gimli jumped off the wall and disappeared into the deadly ocean.

"Mellon nin breathe!"

Haldir fell to his knees, his eyes glazed. Lifeless

"No – Haldir"

"I'm here mellon nin."

"Stay with me."

"I'm not going anywhere."

The vision stopped. He could breathe again, see into his friend's living, concerned eyes, "H-H-Hal...what – um. I erm."

He was alive, "I'm here. Hold onto me, I'm here."

He was alive – but for how long, "No, Hal... plea – you can't"

"Can't what? What's wrong?"

And that's when his eyes rolled back into his head.