Joanna Riggs is like the nucleolus. Joanna is the curator. She makes all the decisions for the museum. The nucleolus makes the ribosomes. Joanna's office is like the nucleus. Joanna can be found in her office. The nucleolus is found in the nucleus. The files found in the filing cabinets in Joanna's office are like the chromosomes. The chromosomes contain genetic information and are found in the nucleus. The files in the filing cabinets are found in Joanna's office. They contain information on the artifacts in the museum, on the finances of the museum, etc. The door to Joanna's office is like the nuclear pores. Nuclear pores let messages to the organelles get to their destinations from the nucleus. Joanna can get through the door so she can give messages to the museum employees and visitors.

The front desk is like the chloroplasts. The chloroplasts contain chlorophyll. They are where photosynthesis takes place and provide energy for the plant cells. The front desk is where visitors pay to get into the museum. There, visitors can get headphones for some exhibits in the exhibition hall and a key card for the temple.

The exhibition hall, the garden, and the temple are like the endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum is the surface for chemical reactions. It is a system of transport of molecules in the cell. The rough endoplasmic reticulum has ribosomes on the surface. It starts protein synthesis. The smooth endoplasmic reticulum doesn't have ribosomes on the surface. It starts lipid and carbohydrate synthesis. The three main exhibit areas hold different displays. The museum visitors walk through the exhibition areas.

The dividers between exhibits in the exhibition hall are like the cytoskeleton. The cytoskeleton provides stability. It anchors the cell membrane and the organelles to the cytoplasm. The dividers are attached to the floor and the walls of the museum. They support the display cases and provide boundaries between display topics. The artifacts in the garden, the temple, and the display cases in the exhibition hall are like the ribosomes. The ribosomes start protein synthesis. The artifacts start interest in the Maya for the museum visitors.

The security system is like the lysosomes. The lysosomes defend the cell against the disease, break down cellular disease, and recycle cellular material. The security system helps protect against the theft of artifacts.

Henrik van der Hune is like a mitochondrion. The mitochondria are the "powerhouses of the cell." They produce ATP and are double-walled. Henrik could be considered the powerhouse of the museum because he's an expert on translating the Mayan glyphs on the artifacts. He works in the lab, which is in the employees-only area of the museum.

The shipping and receiving room is like the Golgi body. The Golgi body acts as the shipping and receiving room of the cell. It adds the final touches to the lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates that the cell needs, and then it ships them off to the other parts of the cell. The museum has its own shipping and receiving room in the employees-only area of the museum.

The water fountain in the employees-only area is like the water vacuole. The water vacuole stores the water for the plant cell. The water fountain provides museum visitors and employees with water.

The outer wall of the museum is like the cell membrane and the cell wall. The cell wall gives structure to the plant cell. The cell membrane is a semi-permeable plasma membrane. It lets some things flow in and out of the cell. The main entrance of the museum, which is part of the outer wall, lets museum visitors and employees in and out of the museum. The outer wall gives structure to the building.

The interior of the museum is like the cytoplasm. The cytoplasm is where the chemical reactions take place. It contains organelles and facilitates waste excretion. The interior of the museum includes the exhibits, offices, lab, and shipping and receiving room.