e l e v e n t h

Disasters were statistically impossible until they happened to you. /Recent happenings in Japan; no pairings

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He hadn't expected it. Nobody had.

The world was a dangerous place, though; you had to agree to that. He agreed one hundred percent – he'd just been rushing to aid New Zealand after the earthquakes toppled Christchurch and the neighboring areas over, and China and Myanmar after that, and even before Australia had been having problems with flooding. And he was an island nation in the Ring of Fire, too – he had earthquakes every day.

So really, nobody had expected it. Not even he did. It had all come on so fast.

He screamed.

Japan screamed and screamed as pain shot through his body. His vision flashed white and his brain felt like it was rocketing around in his head. In an instant he'd collapsed on the floor, punching the ground, hearing thousands of voices through his head, shifting and shifting, carrying only the repeated cries of pain. He could feel them – his people, screaming for their parents grandparents children siblings aunts uncles friends lovers and for —

help—

"Eight point nine," they had said, shaking their heads sadly. "Against the odds. Nearly statistically impossible–"

But then again, disasters were statistically impossible until they happened to you.

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He woke.

There was blood in his mouth. Weary and not bothering to look, he spat it onto the ground. He could barely get up, and yet he did – his people, they needed him as much as he needed them. Every bone in his body felt like it was about to break.

"Otou-san—"

The voice was small and high, not unlike that of a five-year-old girl. Like a cat, his ears adjusted to the familiar word. He rubbed his eyes – was this really once a beautiful coastline city? He could still hear the cries in his head, only now they were wails of sorrow.

"Okaa-san—"

The voice was getting weaker. And suddenly he didn't even know what he was doing anymore, he just started dashing towards the source of the voice – which was a large pile of collapsed cement and rubble – and started digging frantically, ignoring the pain in his back head arms hands legs –

He cleared enough of it away to vaguely make out a form underneath it – he had been correct, it was indeed a little girl, one with large dark eyes and a pretty face. His eyes widened at the familiarity of the features – did she not look like every single member of his family combined into one?

Japan dug faster, despite the searing pain that shot through his body – because the little girl kept on crying out, and the light in her eyes was fading.

"Save me–"

Or at least, was that not what came out of her mouth?

The light in her eyes succumbed to the dark of death, and his heart broke a little for this little girl he didn't know and yet was still one of his people. He bent over and closed her eyelids over her eyes, saying a quick prayer and a quick apology to the little girl for not being able to save. He took her small wrists in his and closed his eyes–

And then he screamed again as he saw the tidal wave approaching, and it was when he was underwater and his lungs were full of seawater that he felt the girl's thin wrists slip out from his own. He could only give one last shudder as everything blacked out.

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Images. Drifting.

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Pale, horrified faces, dark hair streaked with blood and grime, screaming in agony, sifting endlessly, unstopping, through his head.

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He saw the face of the little girl, imagined the family she used to have – loving parents, perhaps, an older brother. Now – gone!

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He saw the nuclear plants behind his eyelids, saw the media tell the world about possible nuclear waves.

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Pain. Sorrow. Did they not all feel this?

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He felt as if he were walking down an endless tunnel – nothing, only black and the sound of his footsteps in the darkness to accompany him.

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And finally – light.

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The first thing he saw was the white of the hospital ceiling.

The first thing he heard was one of his own people rapidly talking in the lilting accent they both shared.

"Mr. Jones, I am afraid you do not understand, there is still the threat of the nuclear power…"

The second thing he heard was the familiar voice, loud and overbearing, but unendingly cheerful. "I'm afraid you are the one who doesn't understand, Mr. Doctor! Nuclear power schnuclear power…"

The second thing he saw was the doctor at the door, and the third thing he saw was the familiar gloved hand sticking itself inside the room.

"But Mr. Jones, you are with such a big group," the doctor was saying hurriedly.

"You don't understand." America moved into Japan's line of sight, and his handsome face was marred with lines of worry. "Listen, Mr. Honda is our friend. We all care about him. And–" he reached inside his pocket and took something out of his wallet. Smiling, he showed it to the doctor. "I'm afraid you don't know who exactly you're dealing with."

Had this been any other situation, Japan would have smacked America for showing the doctor his nation credentials, but this was no ordinary situation. The doctor paled and hurriedly opened both the double doors.

Immediately there was a crowd of people rushing into the room, smiling reassuringly and talking about things he would need. Japan's head burned at trying to recognize everyone at once and he thanked the stars for the size of the hospital room. "Minna…"

"Kiku!" China pushed through the crowd, clasping Japan's hands in his, "Ah, di di, We were all so worried about you, aru! It was Alfred who found you; you were passed out on the beach; thank the stars you were still alive – and I'm so sorry, di di, for everything, I will send aid immediately…"

"Rescue teams," Taiwan cut in urgently, her dark eyes bright with worry for her brother. "Gege, you'll need rescue teams. We are also willing to give aid as well. Kiku, your government has my utmost support."

"I'll help with the rescue teams, da-ze!" Japan's head started hurting again at the familiar voice, but Korea was smiling at him with relief. "We already sent some."

"So did I, as well as Australia, New Zealand, and this idiot over here." England smiled dryly and gestured to America. "Don't go around like that making us worry, all right?"

"I've sent teams and some of my dogs as well," Germany cut in efficiently. "You'll be fine with them."

"You'll need energy sources, da?" Russia was smiling cheerfully, but with none of the underlying sadism underneath. Nevertheless, it still sent chills up Japan's spine. "I'd be more than willing to help you with that."

Everyone started talking at once. Israel was talking of doctors and medicine, while Hungary and Italy were fretting about aid for the people, the Nordics were already deciding on who would send which; and his family was clustered around him, with happy, relieved faces.

"We were so worried," China repeated, shaking his head sadly. His siblings nodded assent.

"You'll rebuild," said Taiwan softly. "You always do. Like a phoenix, right?" She smiled.

Japan could do nothing but blink. Eventually his voice clawed its way back to his mouth. "Everyone," he managed to say, weakly. "You came."

Everyone stopped talking.

America pushed his way to the front and clasped Japan's small hands in his own. "Silly Kiku," he laughed. "Did you honestly think we wouldn't?"

Japan stared. And he thought of the little girl, grinning with her family in heaven, and smiled.

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The Sendai Earthquake of 2011 – a disaster in every sense of the word. My thoughts and prayers are with Japan.

The aid the nations send was actually sent.