I'm not too thrilled with how this one turned out. I would have liked for it to fit the theme better, and honestly I don't think that it's very interesting. But it's good enough. Who knows, maybe you'll think otherwise.


A group of about twenty girls followed their teacher down towards the courtyard. They didn't usually have class outside, so no one really knew what to expect. One girl spoke up. "Miss Dia, it's cloudy today."

Their teacher stopped and looked over at the group. "What was that?" she asked.

One of them, a tall red-haired girl with glasses, raised her hand. She repeated what she'd just said. "Miss Dia, it's cloudy."

Dia nodded. "It is, but why did you bring this to my attention?"

The girl paused for a moment, and then spoke. "How are we supposed to practice light magic if the sun's not out?"

Dia grinned. "Good point. But you're not beginners anymore. This is intermediate light magic, isn't it?"

The students murmured in agreement. "Any Witch worth her salt knows that sometimes, you have to work in unfavorable situations. You know that too. Consider this to be a test of that principle," she continued. "These may not be the best conditions, but you still have to know what to do."

She pulled out her baton, and drew a symbol in the air. It flickered for a little while, and then vanished. "You remember this, right?" she asked. "It's the first step to the spell we learned last week. If you were paying attention, you'll remember how to do this. You'll also remember how the rest of the spell is performed."

She paused, giving the students an expectant look. Most of them seemed alert. "Good. It won't be easy to perform it without sufficient sunlight, but it's still possible. Instead of focusing on what's already there to work with, you'll have to generate some of it yourself. It'll use more energy than usual, so don't overexert yourselves. Now go ahead and give it a try. Practice for a few minutes, and then I'll take questions. Understood?"

The girl from before raised her hand again. "Miss Dia?" she asked.

Dia nodded. "What is it?"

"It's starting to rain."

Sure enough, a light drizzle had begun. Dia sighed loudly. "In that case, we'll just go back to the classroom and practice what we've learned the last few weeks."

The students let out a loud collective groan. "Oh, come ON!" shouted Dia. "I told you, you've got to be prepared for anything! Besides, you can't do anything without a foundation. It's important to keep practicing so you don't forget anything!"

Dia began to walk back towards the building, and the students followed. "One last thing," she said.

Everyone looked at her. "Remember this," she said. "Sometimes things don't happen the way you think they will. Take today for example. The sun may have cooperated, but the weather had other plans."

She began walking again. "C'mon, hurry up. We've still got a class to get through!"