A/N: And I have no idea why I wrote this... Maybe I was thinking about Nekotalia while I was in the shower? Sorry about it being so short; I just wanted to write something cute (and fluffy?) based on Nekotalia, and this came out.

Disclaimer: I don't own Hetalia, Nekotalia, ect.


England often wondered how one's pet could act so much like its owner. Dogs, he could understand. He had plenty in the past, far too many to count, and most of them acted like the former empire. But, he thought as he watched a large, white-furred feline, who covered his lap, paw at his book, cats were a different story altogether.

You could never tell what a cat was thinking, the exception being the large cat on his lap. It acted exactly like that insufferable git across the pond. England could practically tell what the cat wanted by how he acted.

If he wanted food, he would rub against his legs, meowing loudly.

If he wanted attention, he would either yowl long enough for England to get annoyed, get into his lap and distract him from whatever he was doing at the time, or just simply destroy whatever England had in his hands (which in turn caused England to yell at America for raising the cat wrong).

If he wanted England to play with him, he would drop his toy on the nation's lap and look up at him expectantly.

If he wanted affection, he would simply crawl on his lap while purring loudly.

All of which, America would do.

But if acting like his owner didn't prove anything, looking like his owner certainly supported the notion.

The cat had a black mane around his neck that resembled the collar of that blasted bomber jacket America sported all the time, along with little lines under his eyes that resembled Texas. He also had this tuft of fur sticking up exactly where Nantucket was on America.

Not to mention he also was larger than England's own cat, which America proudly pointed out to him before.

But maybe it was nice that the cat acted like its owner, England considered, glancing at America who had fallen asleep on his shoulder. England had never felt so loved.