This is a story of a child's misery. She was never fed, having to go out and find her own food, never clothed, having to sew with trembling fingers, never clean, and always being hit for something.

This child had no name other than the one given to her, by two old friends, who were taken away.

Kagome

.

Kagome was sweeping the shrine, tired after a long day at her waitressing job. Bruises, fresh ones and old, were hidden underneath worn out miko garbs, and she moved carefully, as to not joust the wounds her mother had given her that day.

She sighed, rested her chin on the top of the broom handle, and looked up at the sky. The dead leaves everywhere did nothing to lessen her sullen mood; alas, when Kagome became shrine maiden, it went downhill because the environment took to her moods.

Then Kagome glanced to the bottom of the long staircase, which ended at the foot of the shrine. She began sweeping once more.

"Imouto, what troubles you so?" Sesshoumaru asked her later that evening. Kagome shook her head, pointing to her throat.

"You cannot speak?"

A nod, then she lowered her head in shame.

"InuYasha is dead, as Naraku is, so who-your family?"

Nod.

"Your mother."

Tremble.

Sesshoumaru sighed, then pushed her towards the well.

"Go. I will train your kit well, and keep him as my ward. We will see you in the future, and take you away from your prison."

Kagome hesitated, but nodded and leapt down the well.

"Hikaru!"

"What?"

"What are you doing? Club's about to start!"

His twin got up from his chair and walked next to his brother. It was silently, until Kaoru quietly said,

"Hikaru? What's wrong?"

Hikaru shifted uncomfortably. "Nothing. I just have the strange feeling that we're going to reunite with someone..."

They walked into the club, blinking when no petals came.

"Hey, Tono," They said in unison, "What's going on?"

What he said caused them to look at each other.

"We're getting another princess!" He said excitedly, as the others decorated the room.

The room was being decorated in blacks and silvers, browns and tans, and deep greens, which puzzled them.

"She likes dark, soothing colors, her older brother said," was all Tamaki said, before throwing something soft onto them, "Go, my sons! Decorate!"