"I'm worried about Juan," Cesare offhandedly told Lucrezia.

They were sitting in her room, Lucrezia with Giovanni in her arms. Cesare had taken to coming into her room whenever he felt like it and talking to her.

"About Juan? Why?" she asked, laughing a bit.

"For all his shortcomings, I genuinely believe that he's in pain. He's like a fly, sweet sister. When he's just flying around you hate him and want to kill him, but once he loses a wing and starts flying in circles you feel bad for him."

"If only he could be crushed as easily as a fly," Lucrezia sighed.

"Death may be kinder than letting him live, at this point," Cesare said. "He's going mad, I can see it in his eyes, hear it in his voice. And our Holy Father pretends not to notice, and continues on loving Juan blindly. Why will he never see that I'm the one he should love?"

Cesare had been staring out at the balcony, but turned to face Lucrezia.

"When Juan dies, he'll see," Lucrezia said. "You should just kill him, if it's an act of mercy."

"I think Juan would be in Purgatory for eternity," Cesare said, his voice growing a bit distant.

"Why?"

"Because God and the devil would fight for eternity about who had to end up with him."

Lucrezia laughed, then grew solemn.

"I think all Borgias are going to the same place," she said.

"And where is that, my love?"

"Hell."

"Even the Holy Father?"

"Especially the Holy Father. Cesare, we've all committed so many sins-" she started, but Cesare put up a hand to stop her.

"I've thought about this quite a bit, Lucrezia. God will forgive your sins, I feel, because you're such a sweet person. You and Goffre and maybe our mother will go to Heaven. As for the rest of us…" Cesare said, sighing and trailing off.

Lucrezia sat next to Cesare, putting her head on his shoulder.

"The fly will go to Hell," she said decisively.

"And why do you think this?"

"Where else could a murderer go?"

"Good people murder," Cesare said. "It's not a question of what people have done, my love, it's a question of why."

And on that thought, he got up and left, leaving Lucrezia to consider very carefully the motivation for all of her sins.


A/N: Please review!