Disclaimer: 'Doctor Who' belongs to the universe. Even a Timelord couldn't own it. How could I?

A/N: Ten and Donna get the worst goodbye in the history of fictional best friends ever. I had to rectify it. And yes, the Doctor is selfish for basically forcing her to want to know, but I can see him doing this. As a matter of fact, I firmly believe that he did this. Because he knows Donna will never be at peace again until she remembers.


Remember

"Today is the day you die. Or so the records say. To be honest, Donna, you quite look like it, too."

"Oi! How did you get in here? And what's there to grin about? Who are you?"

"John Smith. We've met. Briefly, a long time ago."

"Don't remember you, sorry."

"I know you don't. That's why I'm here. Tell me, Donna Noble. Have you had a good life?"

"Hasn't been just Donna Noble for a while now. And you're getting rather personal for someone I've only met once, briefly, a long time ago. And when exactly was that? You're a young chap – bit skinny for my taste, though – how can I have met you a long time ago? Long time for you, maybe. Time flies so quickly for you young folk."

"Quicker than you think. And yes. It is a personal question. It's so personal, but I need to know."

"I've been getting along. Would have liked a little more time with my late husband and a little more attention from my daughter back when I wasn't dying, but it's been fine otherwise."

"So I've made the right choice? Donna? Has it been the right choice?"

"I don't know what you are talking about, Mr. John Smith or whoever the hell you are, but I would very much like it if you left an old woman to die in peace instead of pestering her with this nonsense!"

"Die in peace? Good one, that. Funny enough, that's exactly what I'm asking. Will you be able to die in peace? And yes, I know you're perfectly capable of hollering for help – impressive at this age, though not surprising – but bear with me for just a few moments more."

"Why?"

"Because I can answer all your questions, Donna. I can tell you everything. Every blink of an eye when you thought there was something more there than you could actually see. Every breath you took in which you felt like you missed something, something big, something so glaringly obvious and so, so very important. I can show you. And I'm giving you a choice. One I made for you, all those years ago. So I ask you again, Donna Noble, brave, beautiful, brilliant Donna. Can you die in peace if I leave now and it all goes unremembered?"

"Who are you?"

"I'm the Doctor."

"Doctor who?"

"You'll know."

"Will it hurt, then, Doctor?"

"Yes."

"And will it be worth it?"

"I think it will."

"Then show me."

"Are you sure?"

"Of course I'm sure; I wouldn't say it if I wasn't sure! Don't try my patience, you long streak of-…"

"..."

"Doctor?"

"Welcome back, Doctor Donna."

"Good God, Doctor… How could you let me forget you?"

"It was that or let you die. And I couldn't bear to let you die."

"It would have been worth it."

"No, it wouldn't have."

"It's worth it now."

"You were my favourite, you know. Out of all the people I travelled with, you were the one I needed the most."

"I know."

"Rude."

"Watch it, time boy!"

"I'm going to miss you, Donna Noble. I'm going to miss you so much."

"Only fair. I missed you for sixty-four years."

"I know."

"Come here, you."

"…"

"Thank you."

The End