Impulsive Action

DISCLAIMER: Yeah, got nothing, own nothing of psych, just playing a bit in Will Never Happen Land. This was just short little blurb that came to mind. I have no idea what this is or where it's going, so apologies ahead of time.


Impulsive.

Not a word anyone would ever use to describe Carlton Lassiter. Not even Carlton.

He considered this an asset.

He was a planner. Cautious and deliberate with most aspects of his life from his finances to his emotions. To not be so was to leave too much to chance and when one left too much to chance, it was an open invitation for all hell to break loose.

Enter into Evidence, Exhibit A: Shawn Spencer.

Even his relationship with Marlowe, as impulsive as it must have seemed to the outside world, had been thoroughly considered and thought out as he wrote draft after draft of his note of intent. Sure, she was a criminal, but there had been extenuating circumstances and she liked Clint Eastwood films. And him.

Which was not to say he hadn't had his share of somewhat impulsive moments. The department picnic some years back, for example. A few beers too many—on impulse—and he'd wound up making out with the biscuit lady.

Definitely not one of his finer moments.

But no one could accuse him of an inability to learn. The next time liquor had gotten the best of him, it had been spiked, thus he could not be held fully responsible for his actions. Well, except for the repairs to Bobo. Karen had insisted on reparation and really, he couldn't blame her. Even without her directive, he likely would still have offered to fix the oversized pastry.

So no. Not impulsive.

Cautious. Responsible. Steady. Reliable.

All good things.

Which was why he had no idea why, after forty-three years of cautious, responsible, steady planning, he had in the span of less than two weeks committed two incontrovertibly impulsive acts.

Thing, the First: He ended his relationship with Marlowe.

An impulsive decision, made in the span of less than a heartbeat, yet once the thought crystalized in his mind, a decision he knew was undeniably, inescapably right.

Thing, the Second: On a regular, nothing-out-of-the-ordinary Thursday, he kissed Juliet O'Hara.

An impulsive decision, made in the span of less than a heartbeat, yet once the thought crystalized in his mind, a decision he knew was undeniably, inescapably right.