Kataang or Zutara?
This argument has come up a lot, what are your opinions about Kataang and Zutara? Which pairing is more likely? Do you think they're age differences really matter? Everyone's invited! Keep it respectful, though.
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Fullmetal Catalyst

This thread is for all Aang, Katara, and Kataang discussion, debate, and appreciation. All fans of all ships and non-ships are welcome. Please stay relatively close to the topic.

Whatever you decide to post here, Do Not Bash. If you disagree, disagree With Substance (aka, a counterpoint or counterargument). If you fail to follow this rule, the mods reserve the right to punish your forum privileges in the manner they deem suitable.

4/19/2011 . Edited 4/19/2011 #1
ads64drago

wow you made one for both

5/9/2011 #2
Amira Elizabeth

Poor little Kataang thread. Needs some loving. And some good discussion.

Aang is certainly my favorite character. The kid stole my heart in episode 1 with his enthusiasm and quirkiness and that first line: "Will you go penguin sledding with me?".

His growth over the series was an not in-your-face, ever-changing, back and forth roller coaster ride. The Aang in the finale was not entirely the same boy who was rescued from an iceberg and wanted to immediately go penguin sledding and have fun. His behavior in "The Avatar Returns," showed just an inkling of the Aang we continued to see throughout the series - the boy who was loyal to those he cared about, made mistakes and accepted the consequences, and who struggled to balance his humanity and his position as the Avatar (often with a good-natured smile).

Finale Aang was still the undeniably adorable and charming kid from "The Boy in the Iceberg", but he had developed a maturity and seriousness as the series went on. He became more thoughtful, more wise, and was no longer merely a boy looking for a good time. Fundamentally he was still lovable Aang but he had grown into someone who had a maturity and dignity that only comes with facing a task or situation mach larger than oneself - he is an all-powerful being who has girl-problems, is at times awkward, and often just wanted to be a normal boy.

It is this delightful human quality in Aang that kept him from being just the magical hero of the story. He is sweet, he is angsty, he was both selfish and unselfish (a problem I think attributed to both his age and his Avatar vs. Human dilemma), he can be wise and capable, he screwed up in the worst ways, he is at times immature, he is suave, he is insecure and gave in to fear and self-doubt, he understands the value of acting his age, and he displays a wisdom and sense of duty far beyond his years. Aang is an interesting mix of contrasts and for me it has been exciting to watch the progression from Episode 1 Aang to Finale Aang.

Aang is who he is and he makes no apologies for it. He isn't perfect. He could be a brat. Sometimes during the series I wanted to reach in through the TV and smack some sense into him. But that is part of why I think he was successful as a character. The staff of the show has taken what could've been a very unbelievable character (Kung-fu Action Magic Jesus anyone?) and instead they made him into someone who is many times simply like the boy next door. Honestly I have yet to figure out how people can dislike Aang, some even hate him to the point of absurdity. And for me, hating Aang is like hating dessert. It's utterly crazy.

There is always one character that speaks to you, that you have a special place in your heart for. For me, it's Aang.

5/25/2011 #3
heza08

He is sweet, he is angsty, he was both selfish and unselfish (a problem I think attributed to both his age and his Avatar vs. Human dilemma), he can be wise and capable, he screwed up in the worst ways, he is at times immature, he is suave, he is insecure and gave in to fear and self-doubt, he understands the value of acting his age, and he displays a wisdom and sense of duty far beyond his years.

Sometimes I wonder how Aang would have turned out if the genocide hadn't occurred, you know, if he had gotten to finish growing up under the monks' tutelage rather than arm-in-arm with Katara, flying all over the world, scrambling for bending teachers, and fighting the Fire Nation. Because sometimes, while I know he was always fun (getting a lot of that influence from Giatsu, I imagine), I wonder how much of the conflict and struggle he has between being the Avatar and just a little boy was inherent and how much came from being dropped into the deep end of the pool.

Aang, for being an all-powerful Avatar, had a lot of insecurities, and most of the mistakes he made during his journey were borne of the fear, I think, of being left alone. And that fear came from having lost everyone he had ever known, save Appa. Would the same dichotomy have existed in him if he hadn't lost those people, his entire culture?

5/26/2011 #4
GothicSapphire

Aang and Katara aren't my favorite characters, but I like them both as characters and as a couple. I admit they aren't as fun to watch like Sokka/Suki and Mai/Zuko, but they're simple and that's so refreshing compared to the many couples in general I support. Not every couple has to be full of drama(which is unrealistic. Who wants drama in their relationship? I sure as hell don't if I had a boyfriend) or scream it to the world(which I don't mind to a certain extent, but when it shoved down my throat...just shut the f*** up); sometimes a relationship doesn't need words and that's what Aang/Katara has. I find those kinds of relationships beautiful and envy them. Even before it became canon, Aang and Katara gave off a lovers vibe.

I shouldn't be surprised that this topic isn't big like the Zuko/Katara one. All this Aang bashing I've read about(both shipping and non shipping) reminds me of Shinji Ikari from Neon Genesis Evangelion who I adore; both characters aren't the tradtional kid hero. Shinji is shy while Aang is definitely more outgoing, but they both hate fighting, have issues with self doubt that they eventually overcome, and have tragic pasts; Shinji's mother is dead with his father being emotionally detached to the point of sending him away and Shinji spends the entire series trying desperating to gain his love while we all know Aang's story.

There is no doubt in my mind if these characters were girls, they'd get the fans sympathy; but we all know boys cannot be shy or hate fighting. I don't know if this just an American thing, but I read that Aang and especially Shinji are more well liked/popular in other countries.

6/5/2011 #5
Infinite Enemy

I've always been a sucker for Kataang, though I read all kinds of ships.

I guess its because I identify with that kind of relationship in my life--I am such a katara to my brothers and occasionally to my husband that I have sympathy for her bossypants attitude and maternal instincts. And my husband is such a kind, trusting, fun-loving soul that he's very much the kind of lover I think Aang would be. So it's a ship that's close to my heart in that way.

The idea of what Aang would be like if he hadn't lived through what he did is interesting! I think he would have still matured though mistakes and such, but it would have taken a lot longer. Because of what happened, I feel like Aang was forced to grow up a lot sooner than he might have otherwise. But then again, if he had stuck around and had to face the fire nation like the elder monks wanted him to, he might have had just as hard of a young life...This makes me want to go search for some fics to read on this theme!

6/29/2011 #6
GreyAncient

Heck yeah! Canon ship all they way, baby!

6/30/2011 #7
Amira Elizabeth

Okay, this is the Kataang appreciation thread, but I am using it for an Aang post -

This is kind of a mish-mash of posts I made on tumblr:

Aang is one of the best characters in Avatar: The Last Airbender. Disagree of you want, but part of what makes him great is that they took a super being and made sure to keep his humanity. In fact they went to great lengths to maintain it.

So what is it about a bald-headed airbender that could prompt me to write some sort of long and lengthy character analysis. Well there are plenty of folks who think Aang isn't that complex, didn't grow or change, didn't mature, who is deserving of wrath and derision from the fandom because God forbid he make human mistake or make human choices. Surely if the development isn't in your face then it is non-existent. Right? If you need your fiction to hand-hold you, then sorry but you are missing out on so much. I know this from experience - some of the best characterization does come in small subtle packages. People fault Aang for a lack of growth, usually bringing Zuko into the mix as having so much growth and being so dynamic. But having the roller coaster of ups and downs was not Aang's role. That was not what defined his role. It was Zuko's. Aang's role was to learn to survive in a world without his people, to both take on the role of Avatar and put his mark on it, and begin the process of growing up. Aang's character was also about transition - not from villain to hero - but from reluctant boy to hero, from child to young man, from airbender to Avatar.

There was a definite change in the character from the first episode to the last. In the first episode, he is goofy and eager to show off, not observant to the world and its changes. The last episode has a young man who has come into his own - standing tall and proud on the side of the cliff knowing that he didn't have to compromise himself and his beliefs to get the job done, aware of his duty and aware of the world he now lives in. It was not, I repeat not, his job to be the character who goes through the in-your-face character struggle. Can you imagine having both major characters with the same roller-coaster of issues and development? It would be an annoying, grating mess. Rather than have that, the creators and writers have one character whose function is to undergo the great dramatic shift and one character whose function is to go through a shift just as important but more subtle.

And that is far more palatable and carries on the theme of the A & B story lines of Aang and Zuko. So while the rest of the fandom continues debating and discussing all things Zuko, I instead have focused on Aang (and even Sokka). What I have found are characters who are just as complex in their own ways, character who should not be taking a backseat. I will be honest, I am not a Zuko fan. I say this upfront because my liking of Aang happened long before my disliking of Zuko. Nor did it have anything to do with shipping. I thoroughly enjoy Aang as a character and unlike most others, found myself less than thrilled with Zuko.

Does Aang run away, does he behave foolishly - yes of course. But that doesn't mean he's a bad character, it makes him human. He also stands up for his friends and strangers and even enemies, he has put his life on the line, stands up for his beliefs, tries to honor his people, tries to be the best avatar he can, etc.

He's not perfect. Those people who love Aang's character in fact find that to be one of his endearing points. What riles fans of Aang is when statements are made that are completely unfounded - i.e. he did not run away in the finale. He left to calm down. Which is understandable. And something even Zuko approved of. He was then called to by the Lion Turtle. But he didn't run away. Nor was he lording his self-righteousness over Katara in TSR. He was trying to help his friend.

And this is from a post I made about why he is my favorite character:

Aang is certainly my favorite character. The kid stole my heart in episode 1 with his enthusiasm and quirkiness and that first line: "Will you go penguin sledding with me?".

His growth over the series was an not in-your-face, ever-changing, back and forth roller coaster ride. The Aang in the finale was not entirely the same boy who was rescued from an iceberg and wanted to immediately go penguin sledding and have fun. His behavior in "The Avatar Returns," showed just an inkling of the Aang we continued to see throughout the series - the boy who was loyal to those he cared about, made mistakes and accepted the consequences, and who struggled to balance his humanity and his position as the Avatar (often with a good-natured smile).

Finale Aang was still the undeniably adorable and charming kid from "The Boy in the Iceberg", but he had developed a maturity and seriousness as the series went on. He became more thoughtful, more wise, and was no longer merely a boy looking for a good time. Fundamentally he was still lovable Aang but he had grown into someone who had a maturity and dignity that only comes with facing a task or situation mach larger than oneself - he is an all-powerful being who has girl-problems, is at times awkward, and often just wanted to be a normal boy.

It is this delightful human quality in Aang that kept him from being just the magical hero of the story. He is sweet, he is angsty, he was both selfish and unselfish (a problem I think attributed to both his age and his Avatar vs. Human dilemma), he can be wise and capable, he screwed up in the worst ways, he is at times immature, he is suave, he is insecure and gave in to fear and self-doubt, he understands the value of acting his age, and he displays a wisdom and sense of duty far beyond his years. Aang is an interesting mix of contrasts and for me it has been exciting to watch the progression from Episode 1 Aang to Finale Aang.

Aang is who he is and he makes no apologies for it. He isn't perfect. He could be a brat. Sometimes during the series I wanted to reach in through the TV and smack some sense into him. But that is part of why I think he was successful as a character. The staff of the show has taken what could've been a very unbelievable character (Kung-fu Action Magic Jesus anyone?) and instead they made him into someone who is many times simply like the boy next door. Honestly I have yet to figure out how people can dislike Aang, some even hate him to the point of absurdity. And for me, hating Aang is like hating dessert. It's utterly crazy

There is always one character that speaks to you, that you have a special place in your heart for. For me, it's Aang.

11/10/2011 . Edited 11/10/2011 #8
GothGeek89

Aang/Katara is an underrated pairing in the fandom and I'm not surprised this topic is still so small. I'm not fond of Katara, but she is good for Aang. They don't have the certain "spice" like Sokka/Suki or Mai/Zuko(not every couple needs one. Each has their own way of expressing their passion for eachother.) or pointless drama. Honestly, who wants drama in relationship? I sure as hell don't and hate it when writers feel like they just have to put it in there when it's so pointless. One of my OTPs, Remy/Rogue from X-Men have gotten so f*** up over the years because so many writers feeling that they must have so much agnst to keep readers. I could start a drinking game of how many times Marvel broke them up then put them back together. I just don't have the patience for the "on again. off again." b***; you only get one try after the first break up then move on. Is it that hard?

Speaking(more like ranting) of Marvel, that's how I see Aang/Katara; they're the Scott/Jean of Avatar. They're simple, safe, and just fit eachother so much that I can't see them with anyone else. To many people, that's boring; but I find it refreshing compared to many couples who work off of constant drama(and yet, they have the huge fanbases. I'll just never understand it). Of course, I'm a minority. Just like most Avatar fans want Zuko/Katara instead, I've had to deal with most X-Men fans who still want Logan/Jean to happen.

11/14/2011 #9
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