Of Cabbages and Kings
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Olorime

A gozação era: O chefe olha para debaixo da mesa e diz "Bonita camisinha, Fernandinho". E o Fernandinho também olha para debaixo da mesa: "A do senhor também é linda".

LOL!

Brazilians and their naughty humor!

Mas, veja, a gente NUNCA pede uma camisa usando diminutivo; porque há esse sentido de se estar falando de preservativo

Now, I know. Otherwise I would have probably used the diminutive. LOL!

I learn loads from our little conversations. You are awesome!

:D

1/5/2011 . Edited 1/5/2011 #31
Just a Wili

Brazilians and their naughty humor!

Hehe, and that was in the 80's. But, yes, we don't take anyting (including ourselves) too seriously.

I learn loads from our little conversations. You are awesome!

Thanks a lot! And I love to talk to you, Viv, either in Portuguese or English. :)))

1/6/2011 . Edited 1/6/2011 #32
Virtuella

Another interesting thing:

Apart from a very few Latin words (respublika, universalnuy, dom), much of Russian vocabulay is pretty alien to the west European ear with words like chleb for bread, do svidanye for good-bye or ponimayu for understand, BUT the Russian word for sausages is sosiski.

And magasin is a shop in Russian. This interests me, because in German, Magazin usually means the publishing format, but it can also mean the part of a rifle where the bullets are stored. Is there any other language that uses that root to mean storage?

1/6/2011 #33
Virtuella

And I've just found a rather interesting article on false friends on Wikipedia:

Apparently, false friends are not the same as false cognates, the latter being similar words that just happen to also have similar meanings without any actual ethymological connection.

I thought this was the funniest example of a false friend in that article:

In Swedish, the word "rolig" means "fun" (as in "It was a fun party"), while in the closely related languages Danish and Norwegian it means "calm" (as in "he was calm despite all the furore around him"). This can sometimes cause confusion: a Swede exclaiming "It'll be fun!" will have a Dane thinking "How boring."

1/6/2011 #34
militaryhistory

Is there any other language that uses that root to mean storage?

English uses the term that way, although it has fallen out of the common language in that regard. Admittedly, magazine was used to describe a place where implements of war were stored.

1/6/2011 #35
Morthoron

Magazine in English can also mean a place where goods are stored, particularly a place where ammo/munitions are stored. It is also the part of the gun where ammo is fed into the firing chamber. From Arabic makhāzin (storehouse) .

1/6/2011 #36
Just a Wili

And magasin is a shop in Russian.

Magazine in Portuguese means a shop with several types of certain goods, stored by type. Not exactly a department store, though.

1/6/2011 #37
Just a Wili

And I'm not sure if I wrote about this before, but I took one year of Tupi (an Indian language that has several of its terms used daily in Brazil mixed with Portuguese) at college.

So, in Tupi, we can't say "my tree" or "my land", because Nature belongs to no one.

And in Tupi we just count until 4. More than that is nan, which means "several." To say "ten" we say "my hands". To say "twenty", "my hands, my feet". When the Jesuits translated the Bible into Tupi, that passage about Jesus in the desert was like this: "My hands, my feet, thy hands, thy feet days Jesus was in the desert..." :)

1/6/2011 . Edited 1/6/2011 #38
Virtuella

That's an amazing way to count. Reminds me of Terry Pratchett's trolls. They count one, two, three, many, many-one, many-two, many-three, many-many, many-many-one...

1/6/2011 #39
Just a Wili

So you see how the Americas were diverse. Because the Maya not only made astronomical observations, they used zero before the Arabs.

Now, in Tupi: there are eight Demonstrative Pronouns, because you can't say only this, that, these, those, you have to specify if this/these or that/those are visible (or looking at it) or not.

1/6/2011 . Edited 1/6/2011 #40
Morthoron

Now, in Tupi: there are eight Demonstrative Pronouns, because you can't say only this, that, these, those, you have to specify if this/these or that/those are visible (or looking at it) or not.

It sounds like they talked their way to extinction.

1/6/2011 #41
Virtuella

you have to specify if this/these or that/those are visible (or looking at it) or not

I wonder why they consider that(invisible) necessary?

1/6/2011 #42
Just a Wili

I wonder why they consider that(invisible) necessary?

Maybe because they lived in a tropical jungle and could be killed by a pouncing animal? This invisible means "out of sight", so, if you have your back to something, it will be considered "invisible."

Ah, and they were cannibals. The first Jesuit who celebrate Brazil's First Mass ended up eaten.

1/6/2011 #43
Morthoron

Ah, and they were cannibals. The first Jesuit who celebrate Brazil's First Mass ended up eaten.

Hence the term, Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday! They obviously gave up eating priests during Lent.

1/6/2011 #44
Just a Wili

Hence the term, Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday! They obviously gave up eating priests during Lent.

LOL

Which reminds me: days of week!

In Portuguese: Monday is Segunda-Feira, which means "Second Fair". And there we go: Terça-Feira or "Third Fair" (Tuesday), Quarta-Feira or "Forth Fair" (Wednesday), Quinta-Feira or "Fifth Fair" (Thursday), Sexta-Feira or "Sixth Fair" (Friday), Sábado (Saturday) and Domingo (Sunday).

Robinson Crusoe's friend Friday is called here... Sexta-Feira (Sixth Fair).

1/6/2011 . Edited 1/6/2011 #45
Olorime

In Portuguese: Monday is Segunda-Feira, which means "Second Fair". And there we go: Terça-Feira or "Third Fair" (Tuesday), Quarta-Feira or "Forth Fair" (Wednesday), Quinta-Feira or "Fifth Fair" (Thursday), Sexta-Feira or "Sixth Fair" (Friday), Sábado (Saturday) and Domingo (Sunday).

Robinson Crusoe's friend Friday is called here... Sexta-Feira (Sixth Fair).

It always messes me up. I can never remember which one is which. LOL! What's so wrong with "Lunes, Martes, Miércoles, Jueves, Viernes, Sábado y Domingo"?

1/6/2011 #46
Morthoron

What's the significance of the word fair? Is it like "going to the market" type of fair?

1/6/2011 #47
Virtuella

So why is there no First Fair?

1/6/2011 #48
Virtuella

In German there is a silent war between those who call Saturday "Samstag" and those who call it "Sonnabend." Each think the other is despicable.

1/6/2011 #49
Olorime

In Spanish it is, but the word is "Feria." These people of the language of the oranges pronounce everything funky. :P

Many languages use the name of the country "Portugal" to refer to the fruit "orange" as the Portuguese introduced it to many places through commerce. Funny is that Spanish (naranja) took the name from the Persian "narenj" which was taken from sanskrit and it describes some bitter citrus instead of the Arabic (al bartukhaal). " There is no P sound in Arabic, it shifts to b and the kh is a guttural shift of the g. Even funnier is that in modern Persian, orange is now " porteghâl."

In case anyone was wondering why I called Portuguses the language of the oranges. :P

1/6/2011 . Edited 1/6/2011 #50
Virtuella

In Spanish it is, but the word is "Feria."

Which is similar to the German Ferien meaning (school) holidays. Probably from the same root.

1/6/2011 #51
Just a Wili

In Portuguese, the names came from Catholic liturgy, which means they came from Liturgical Latin.

Latin Feria = Fair = Festive Day

The First Fair is Sunday. Here:

Latin Prima Feria = Dominica Dies. In Portuguese = Domingo = Sunday

Latin Secunda Feria. In Portuguese = Segunda-Feira = Monday

Latin Tertia Feria. In Portuguese = Terça-Feira = Tuesday

Latin Quarta Feria. In Portuguese = Quarta-Feira = Wednesday

Latin Quinta Feria. In Portuguese = Quinta-Feira = Thursday

Latin Sexta Feria. In Portuguese = Sexta-Feira = Friday

Latin Sabbatum. In Portuguese = Sábado = Saturday

1/6/2011 . Edited 1/6/2011 #52
Olorime

In Portuguese, the names came from Catholic liturgy, which means they came from Liturgical Latin.

Oh, I didn't know that. How interesting!

We are heathens, we use the Roman names. :P

ETA: Except for Sábado which everyone knows comes from the Hebrew "Sabbath"

1/6/2011 . Edited 1/6/2011 #53
Olorime

Dominica Dies.

The day of the Lord. Wooo hoo, I remember my Latin lithurgy!!! I am ready for the convent!

1/6/2011 #54
Virtuella

May I just say that you girls are my BESTEST FRIENDS. The only person I know in RL who likes to talk about these things is my friend Elizabeth, and I only see her occasionally now that she's retired. We used to sit together at lunchtime and discuss linguistic quirks and the other colleagues would slowly drift off to sleep...

1/6/2011 . Edited 1/6/2011 #55
Virtuella

Except for Sábado which everyone knows comes from the Hebrew "Sabbath"

The weird thing is that pious Scots call the Sunday the Sabbath.

1/6/2011 #56
Olorime

The weird thing is that pious Scots call the Sunday the Sabbath.

Ohhhh... but it's the first day of the week, and it was at the seventh day that the Lord took his rest (if I remember my Genesis correctly).

1/6/2011 #57
Just a Wili

Oh, I didn't know that. How interesting!

We are heathens, we use the Roman names. :P

I prefer the pagan names! Sun Day! Thor's Day! Much cooler!

And if you have any doubts about your days of week in Portuguese: just consider Sunday as the "First Fair", then start counting: Second Fair, Third Fair, etc etc. We abbreviate them to 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. Then you have Saturday and Sunday.

1/6/2011 #58
Virtuella

I think it's mostly because it's the day of rest, but the point is rather that Jesus arose at the beginning, not the end of the week. Anyway, Sabbath in that context is not so much a week name, but a definition.

1/6/2011 #59
Olorime

May I just say that you girls are my BESTEST FRIENDS. The only person I know in RL who likes to talk about these things is my friend Elizabeth, and I only see her occasionally naw that she's retired. We used to sit together at lunchtime and discuss linguistic quirks and the other colleagues would slowly drift off to sleep...

I didn't know you enjoyed these sort of topics. I think learning about languages is fascinating. I always say that learning a new language opens you up to the cultures of the people that speak those languages. There are nuances and different things that are just not translatable and are a shame to miss.

I am glad you started this thread, and I'll pass along some interest essays I've found on Spanish and its roots (if you are interested).

*hugs V*

1/6/2011 #60
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