Of Cabbages and Kings
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Thranduil Oropherion Redux

Chocolate. I don't know what it's like in America, here in Britain people tend to give children enormous chocolate eggs, almost the size of ostrich eggs. Though apparently people complain they're too small.

We do chocolate eggs, and chocolate rabbits and jelly beans and of course, peeps. But we also color hard-boiled eggs, and those obviously have a limited shelf life.

I haven't had one single piece of Easter candy yet.

4/8/2012 #4,111
Thranduil Oropherion Redux

*pokes Milhist pointedly* How was your Easter Sunday, or the pagan festival whose name I cannot be arsed to copy and paste, people?

'Twas good. And yours?

Who poked Milhist pointedly?

The very best Easter I ever spent was with my aunt, uncle and cousin in upstate New York. Our two families went on a picnic in the Catskills and spent the day by a waterfall. Absolutely lovely. My cousin fell in. Ha-ha!

4/8/2012 #4,112
AltearazCreator

Randy, I just lol'd. I saw a much younger Norman Reedus in Blade II a few minutes ago, and I actually realised it was him under all that hair.

4/8/2012 #4,113
piewacket

I Germany and Britian, we also get these charities that collect surplus food from, e.g. farmer's markets, supermarkets, but also from big Hotel buffets etc and make it available to poor people. I think these are very good, because they reduce waste at the same time. Does anyone else have them in their country?

They do that here as well. Lately, they've been running into more and more issues though as "do good" legislators pass rules and laws about food handling that are making it impossible.

4/8/2012 #4,114
Nimbus Llewelyn

Who poked Milhist pointedly?

Me.

4/8/2012 #4,115
Thranduil Oropherion Redux

I Germany and Britian, we also get these charities that collect surplus food from, e.g. farmer's markets, supermarkets, but also from big Hotel buffets etc and make it available to poor people. I think these are very good, because they reduce waste at the same time. Does anyone else have them in their country?

They do that here as well. Lately, they've been running into more and more issues though as "do good" legislators pass rules and laws about food handling that are making it impossible.

If you're talking about perishable foods, it makes some sense to insure that the foods being given away aren't actually perished. A few months ago, I read Anthony Bourdain's book about the restaurant business, and he talked about passing on produce and meat that weren't on the absolute height of freshness -- in other words, not good enough for a fine dining restaurant but okay to consume -- but even I would wonder a bit about giving away bread that had been on someone's table in a restaurant, or passing on the crab salad from a buffet if it hadn't been handled very carefully.

Another book I read recently is The American Way of Eating by Tracey McMillan. She worked undercover picking produce in California, selling produce at a Walmart super-store, and in a restaurant kitchen. The interesting part of the book was the grocery part, whjich highlighted the difficulty of transporting and distributing perishable produce, and why the food industry is moving towards foods with a long shelf life at a negative impact to our health.

4/9/2012 #4,116
Thranduil Oropherion Redux

And, good morning.

4/9/2012 #4,117
R. Zancan

Chocolate eggs for everyone!

We had an egg hunt in our living room last night - excellent fun ^_^

Happy Easter every one, however you take it :)

4/9/2012 #4,118
R. Zancan

Chocolate. I don't know what it's like in America, here in Britain people tend to give children enormous chocolate eggs, almost the size of ostrich eggs. Though apparently people complain they're too small.

I was rather disgusted to find that your bog standard Cadbury's easter egg was £1.60 in my local supermarket - how are you supposed to tell your child that they're only allowed one when they're selling them so cheap!

And I know it causes problems because me and S have had three in the last four days XD

4/9/2012 #4,119
Hamfast Gamgee

Good evening!

4/9/2012 #4,120
Just a Wili

Hello!

I was surprised to read that Thomas Kinkade has died this weekend at only 54. I know he was not appreciated here (at least at the time his name popped in), but I liked his dreamy (nothwithstanding the Hallmark card quality to them) Christmas scenes.

4/9/2012 #4,121
The Lauderdale

Thomas Kinkade pictures are kind of dystopian. Cozy little houses, all on fire inside...

On the other hand, I was just fascinated to learn that he was a background artist on Ralph Bakshi's Fire and Ice.

4/9/2012 . Edited 4/9/2012 #4,122
Third World

Thomas Kinkade pictures are kind of dystopian. Cozy little houses, all on fire inside...

As someone who has never saw snow, I find his winter scenes very pretty. The first Christmas wallpaper I had in my first computer was one of his drawings: a huge pine tree by a lovely house, all lit.

Ralph Bakshi's Fire and Ice

I had to google that one. It seems interesting.

4/9/2012 #4,123
Just a Wili

Argh, sorry, that one above is me. I was just checking my other account.

4/9/2012 #4,124
Morthoron

I was surprised to read that Thomas Kinkade has died this weekend at only 54. I know he was not appreciated here (at least at the time his name popped in), but I liked his dreamy (nothwithstanding the Hallmark card quality to them) Christmas scenes.

I heard his death was a probable case of saccharine overdose.

4/9/2012 #4,125
R. Zancan

I was surprised to read that Thomas Kinkade has died this weekend at only 54. I know he was not appreciated here (at least at the time his name popped in), but I liked his dreamy (nothwithstanding the Hallmark card quality to them) Christmas scenes.

I only became aware of him recently in a lecture on high and low art.

He wasn't high art =/

4/10/2012 . Edited 4/10/2012 #4,126
militaryhistory

Yeah. He wasn't.

Although I will say I didn't mind his work in small doses.

4/10/2012 #4,127
Virtuella

My Art teacher would have spoken about the difference between Art and decoration. Though I think he would have struggled to define the exact distinction. It's easy when you compare this Mr Kinkade to Paul Cezanne, but what about August Macke? What about Jack Vettriano? What about the lanscape paintings and flower vases found in local Art club exhibitions? I have three beautiful seascapes painted by my mother-in-law in my sitting room. Are they Art?

4/10/2012 #4,128
R. Zancan

Jack Vettriano was also cited in the lecture as 'low art'.

Indeed the phrase 'low art' connotes a negative association, but as you say, it's decoration. There's absolutely nothing wrong with a person wanting a Kinkade, and indeed people do - he was a gozillionaire. Rating how and where low art becomes high art, or visaversa is... well, impossible. Some people would reject the claim that Damien Hurst's work is art, even though it would appear to qualify for the Tate, as you're probably aware; they just opened his retrospective.

As for landscapes and flower vases, I'd say they weren't 'art' - perhaps you could say they were 'craft'? Art for me is as conceptual as visual, and the ideas beyond it constitute as much of its entity as the physical. A painting of a vase of flowers... is a painting of a vase of flowers. At the same time - it's alright to like something on an aesthetic basis alone, or for the fact it was a gift, or that it matches the space it's in beautifully.

4/10/2012 #4,129
Virtuella

Well, exactly, that is the point, isn't it? If I put it up in my sitting room, then its function is decoration. A painted vase of flowers is more durable than an actual vase of flowers. If I want to see Art, I go to a museum. Real Art that impresses me would be way too intense to hang over my sofa. A decoration picture can be beautiful, just like a real flower is beautiful. Having said that, I don't like Kinkade's pictures. I don't like the colours, I don't like the fuzzy blurriness, I don't like the general style. I wouldn't use him for decoration for the same reason that I don't have pink crocheted doilies on my coffee table or Kate&William wedding mugs on the sideboard. My mother-in-law's seascapes are delightful. They are fresh, crisp and charming.

4/10/2012 . Edited 4/10/2012 #4,130
Nimbus Llewelyn

I thank the Lord that I found 'Twisting the Hellmouth'. It is a veritable repository of excellent stories.

4/10/2012 #4,131
R. Zancan

If I want to see Art, I go to a museum.

We could debate about that :P

Having said that, I don't like Kinkade's pictures. I don't like the colours, I don't like the fuzzy blurriness, I don't like the general style.

He called himself 'a painter of light' XD He wasn't. I thought his paintings were ridiculous. I think it's safe to say he was kitsch.

Any paintings I might place in my home would have to be non-specific abstract colour paintings, I just don't like the notion of imagery or language about my home - or anything more connotative than pure and somewhat untainted colour. Choosing anything other than a selection of colours on a canvas would just be too much pressure :P

My lecturer gave the example of Constable's Haywain - the painting is a work of art, we can accept that. But what about the print? The postcard? The greetings card? The jigsaw puzzle? The teacup? A jigsaw of the Haywain is 'kitsch', there's no two ways about that - but at what point does the painting lose its status? It may even be fair to say that viewing the painting in the gallery it's housed in, face to face, is the only depiction of it that retains it's 'high art' status.

4/10/2012 #4,132
R. Zancan

Is this Art?

They're amazing good, but what on earth is the point?

We've got cameras so it's a waste of time.

4/10/2012 #4,133
Nimbus Llewelyn

I feel a really good pencil drawing has more life in it. Due to the fact that more effort than pressing a button has been put into it.

4/10/2012 #4,134
R. Zancan

What button are you talking about?

4/10/2012 #4,135
Nimbus Llewelyn

A button on a camera.

4/10/2012 #4,136
Virtuella

My lecturer gave the example of Constable's Haywain - the painting is a work of art, we can accept that. But what about the print? The postcard? The greetings card? The jigsaw puzzle? The teacup? A jigsaw of the Haywain is 'kitsch', there's no two ways about that - but at what point does the painting lose its status? It may even be fair to say that viewing the painting in the gallery it's housed in, face to face, is the only depiction of it that retains it's 'high art' status.

An online friend of mine has written a very thought-provoking play based on Walter Benjamin's "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction."

I thought his paintings were ridiculous.

I think that depends on the context. They would be appropriate (though not exactly inspired) as illustration for a volume of fairy tales.

Which leads me to another brand of decorative art, one that I admire: traditional Russian FAIRY TALE ILLUSTRATIONS.

We read "Mergen Ee Yevo Drusya" at school and the teacher gave as black-and-white photocopies of the pictures. I spent ages at home colouring them in.

I just don't like the notion of imagery or language about my home

I'm okay with images. It's words that make me nervous. I know a few people who virtually wallpaper their homes with postcards featuring fotos and "edifying" words. I think even Bible verses or profound philosophy become tacky when pinned up on the doorframe under a photo of footprints in the sand or fields of cornflowers or suchlike. One exception: Next to my desk at work I have pinned the following sentence whose author I cannot recall at the moment: "Letting people stick to what comes easily to them is a form of cognitive imprisonment." I do believe it makes me a marginally better teacher to be reminded of this from time to time.

4/10/2012 . Edited 4/10/2012 #4,137
Virtuella

Is this Art?

They're amazing good, but what on earth is the point?

We've got cameras so it's a waste of time.

It's about function again, isn't it? To render a faithful likeness is no longer necessary in this day and age, though obviously it was much appreciated by previous generations. But yes, we wouldn't think something was Art that merely shows us something exactly as it is, would we? We'd expect Art to make us look at the world in a different way.

What do people think about Escher? Art or not?

And what about photography? Under which circumstances is it Art?

4/10/2012 #4,138
R. Zancan

An online friend of mine has written a very thought-provoking play based on Walter Benjamin's "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction."

I read that in the lead up to writing an essay on the falsified antique. What's the play about?

They would be appropriate (though not exactly inspired) as illustration for a volume of fairy tales.

But they weren't XD They were fairytales for deluded adults XD

It's words that make me nervous. I know a few people who virtually wallpaper their homes with postcards featuring fotos and "edifying" words

You must have seen the 'words' that you can buy in Home Departments these days - wooden letter blocks saying 'Home' 'Love' 'Baking' - that stuff really boggles my mind. And I agree, the moment you put some philosophy/poetry up on a wall you've undone it.

Those illustrations are lovely; I think it's brilliant to bring illustrations to a child's story, a new dimension of learning, identifying and associating comes to the story.

4/10/2012 #4,139
Virtuella

And another question: How much of what hangs in the national galleries isn't really Art but merely the decoation of ages past, made respectable by age?

Also, what paintings do people truly admire? Here are some of my favourites:

The Château at Médan by Cezanne: (It hangs in Glasgow, so I've often seen it for real.)

Improvisation by Kandinsky:

The Broken Column by Frida Kahlo:

Albrecht Dürer's self portrait of 1500:

None of these I would hang over my sofa.

4/10/2012 #4,140
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