The Reviews Lounge, Too
A forum for The Reviews Lounge, Too community, which promotes reviewing of all stories and spotlighting talented writers. Don't forget to read the rules and introduce yourself first!
New Follow Forum Follow Topic
Page 1 2 3 4 11 .. Last Next »
Rosawyn

Since several people have been asking for something like this (for quite a while now actually) and Wendy and Time have both asked me to make this thread, I'm making the thread. Anyway, the purpose of this thread (as is hopefully suggested by the title) is to help us all learn to write better reviews and also explain what we as the RLt consider to be the guidelines for quality reviews.

Good Quality Reviews

-Should contain clear evidence that you did in fact read the fic you are reviewing. Generic statements that could be copied and pasted onto any fic such as "good job" or "nice work" and the like aren't very helpful as far as feedback goes.

-Use correct spelling and grammar. Obviously, it's okay to be a little silly sometimes, but it's also important to make yourself understood.

-Are polite and freindly.

...

(This post will likely be edited to add more or clarify these points).

Tips for Writing Better Reviews

Many people have told me that they don't often leave reviews because they don't know what to say, they don't even know where to begin. I'm not the best reviewer in the world, but I do have some advice for those who are very unsure how to even start writing a review.

-Find something specific in the story that you like/enjoy/appreciate and mention it.

-If a line or a scene stood out to you as especially good, mention that.

-If you see something that you think could be improved, mention it (politely). You don't have to suggest a way to fix the problem, but if you can think of a way that you think would work, the author would probably appreciate your idea even if they don't end up using it.

-If the story made you feel happy/sad/angry/giggly, mention that. Even if it's not the emotional reaction the author was intending, it is helpful to know how the fic affected you.

...

Anyway, I'm sure I'm not the only one with good ideas, so I hope other people will suggest their own tips as well. :)

7/27/2012 . Edited by Wendy Brune, 11/27/2013 #1
Desktop Warrior

A bit of Time!advice: remember what you've learned in your English classes about analyzing literature. Even the most widely-read classics were written by people like you and me, and fan fiction is no different. Consider the tone of the story: does the narrator come across neutrally, or do they have strong feelings about something? Are they arrogant? Naive? Scared? Look at the atmosphere being developed: how do you imagine you would feel in the situations being described in the story? Is the author building up suspense? Or is there a sense of moody despair, a feeling that things are the same mess they've always been and it'll never change? Is the atmosphere ethereal, like you're dreaming the scenario described? Look at how the story flows. Do action scenes have a sense of urgency when you're reading them? Do more peaceful ones go by slower, with more description and eloquent phrasing?

Most importantly, characterization, characterization, characterization. Who is the character? What does their personality seem like from what you're reading about them? WHY is their personality the way it is - can you maybe find out or guess from the story? Why do they act the way they do? Is there something symbolic about their name, appearance, actions, etc.? Can you identify with the character? How is the character being portrayed by the author? How do they interact with other characters, if they interact at all? What is the relationship between characters in any story and why is it the way it is? In short, does a character feel like a real, complex person to you?

EDIT: These are just a couple things to get people started. There's obviously a lot more to think about when writing a good review, but it's important to note that writing critics think about the exact same things in their reviews that authors do for their stories.

7/28/2012 . Edited 7/28/2012 #2
darkin520

Well, I always give my famous darkin520 chapter rundown, pointing out what I liked and how I felt when I read it, etc. If you've gotten a review from me, you know what I'm taling about. IF there is any criticism, I often save it for last...but I always say something at the end after this like, "Overall, well done. If you fix _______, it might be better."

That's my advice. Hope that helps. :)

EDIT: Forgot to mention I try to be as tactful as I can about my criticisms.

7/28/2012 . Edited 7/28/2012 #3
songstar13

It doesn't work so well with the new review set up on the site, but my advice to readers: Write the review as you read! If something made you snort milk out your nose because it was so funny, pause in your perusal of the story for a moment to make note of that! I know I personally enjoy reviews that are constructed this way, as I almost get to experience my story anew through the reader's eyes.

Another possible strategy, though one to be used sparingly: It's fine to directly mention or even quote (once again SPARINGLY) lines from the story that you especially liked. I have a rather faithful reviewer who is always pointing the lines she finds to be the most striking and well-written, and adding her commentary on why she liked those lines so much. It really helps me to target the areas I'm strong in, which is just as important as discovering where you need to improve. Once again for emphasis, this really just needs to be the salt on the substance of the review; AT LEAST ninety-five percent of the review should be your own original words. The author doesn't need you to rewrite the entire story in the review---at that point this strategy becomes a bit useless if you liked EVERY line.

Just my two cents!

Happy reading, good luck with reviews!

7/28/2012 #4
memingers

It doesn't work so well with the new review set up on the site

Ugh, I completely agree. I love reviewing as I read, and now my reviews aren't as long because I forgot some of the things I wanted to say.

My advice is: make sure you always point out something that could be fixed. Even if you think the story is flawless, try to find one thing to make the review not a massive praise-pile. Be polite, of course, but most authors love getting praise, but love it even more when they get polite, meaningful critique. Also, point out exactly what you like, as "I luved it!!! Updatez sooon" really isn't helpful, whereas "I loved the way you used _____ and ___ was really well written. You also have excellent grammar/spelling" is a lot more useful because we know what to do next time!

7/28/2012 . Edited 7/28/2012 #5
rachele X

Hey on the subject of reviews, I have a question. So a week or so ago, I was doing the Review Tag and I read a story in the Sherlock fandom, which is not a fandom I'm all that familiar with. If the story we're reading is hard to follow and that might be becuase we don't know the fandom all that well, should we mention that? Like, "this was a little hard to follow for me, someone not too familiar with the fandom"? Basically what I'm asking is if you think it's important for the story to be readable by people who don't know the fandom?

7/28/2012 #6
Holsch

I don't have any advice, just a question. If a reader genuinely didn't enjoy the story and wants to tell you why in a polite way, are you okay with a review that is completely non-complimentary but non-malicious? Or would you be offended by a review that rattles off all the perceived mistakes in your story even if it's phrased and meant to be helpful?

Myself, I don't mind any review so long as it doesn't resort to personal insults, and even then it depends. What's RLt's take?

7/28/2012 #7
songstar13

Basically what I'm asking is if you think it's important for the story to be readable by people who don't know the fandom?

Some people prefer this, but it's my personal belief that fan fiction is inherently written for people who would know the fandom---if not for Review Tag, why else would they be reading it? So, I don't comment on canon-correctness or anything of the like unless I'm familiar with canon. You can mention that you didn't know the fandom if you want to, but either way it's not a big deal.

Neo, I'm leaving your question up to one of the mods to answer since you're asking for the "official RLt stance," but my UNofficial viewpoint is that we simply promote non-flame, non-GREATJOBPLZUPDATESOON type reviews.

7/28/2012 . Edited 7/28/2012 #8
bloodbuzz

Personally? No.

It's aimed at (and specifically placed in) the Sherlock fandom. There should be a certain level of readability (grammar, spelling, flow/syntax, etc.), but other than that, you can't expect an author to white fanfic for the general public (that's why fandoms exist). If you don't know Sherlock, you're going to find it difficult to read Sherlock fic.

7/28/2012 #9
bloodbuzz

Penguin, that's half the point of reviews: constructive criticism.

7/28/2012 #10
The Death Frisbee

Taking my thoughts re. rachele's question to brainstorming/discussion.

7/28/2012 #11
Rosawyn

Wow, I'm so happy to see so many people using this thread and posting good advice and such. :)

make sure you always point out something that could be fixed. Even if you think the story is flawless, try to find one thing to make the review not a massive praise-pile.

Obviously not everyone is going to agree on everything, and this is one thing I'm going to have to say I disagree with you on. I don't think it is at all necessary to try to find something wrong with a story if you believe it is flawless. If nothing jumps out as being a problem, I don't try to create one. To me, that feels dishonest. You don't have to agree with me, but that's what I think about this.

If the story we're reading is hard to follow and that might be becuase we don't know the fandom all that well, should we mention that? Like, "this was a little hard to follow for me, someone not too familiar with the fandom"? Basically what I'm asking is if you think it's important for the story to be readable by people who don't know the fandom?

That's certainly something you can mention in a review. I usually start all reviews of a fandom I don't know very well by stating that I don't know the fandom well (or at all). I don't think it counts so much as an actual criticism of the story, though, at least not in the case that it's something that needs to be "fixed," because I firmly believe that fanfiction is meant to be read by other fans of the show/book/movie/game, and it is not our job as fanfiction writers to re-tell the entire plot or re-describe the characters for people we assume will already know all of that. Some fanfiction is just going to end up being easier to understand by non-fans and some is going to be a lot harder, and that doesn't mean either is better or worse. That said, yeah, I will mention if I had hard time following the story because I had no idea who the characters were or how they are related or what they were supposed to be doing. I'll also mention it if I actually had no trouble at all following the story despite not being familiar with the fandom.

7/28/2012 #12
Holsch

That's how I feel about it, baobabs, but I suppose the conflict is, is it alright even if you're deviating from the formula of "compliment, criticism, compliment"? Are compliments key to making the criticism constructive, even if it's as simple as ending on "I think you have a lot of potential"?

7/28/2012 #13
Rosawyn

If a reader genuinely didn't enjoy the story and wants to tell you why in a polite way, are you okay with a review that is completely non-complimentary but non-malicious? Or would you be offended by a review that rattles off all the perceived mistakes in your story even if it's phrased and meant to be helpful?

Myself, I don't mind any review so long as it doesn't resort to personal insults, and even then it depends. What's RLt's take?

I can't speak for RLt here, but I think that if a reader didn't enjoy anything at all about the story at all, it is okay to say that in a polite and helpful way. That said, I hardly ever do that myself. I try very hard to find at least one thing that I felt worked in the fic, at least one thing that I thought was well-done, even if overall I didn't enjoy the fic. Sometimes, I can see what the writer was trying to do and I can tell that they were actually successful in that, even if I didn't actually like it.

it's my personal belief that fan fiction is inherently written for people who would know the fandom

I very much agree with this.

So, I don't comment on canon-correctness or anything of the like unless I'm familiar with canon.

I would just like to add here that it's sort of a personal peeve of mine when someone who's not familiar with a specific adaptation of something makes comments on what they perceive as mistakes in a fic that are not mistakes at all, just the fic being based on a different adaptation than the one they know. For example, if a fic is based on the original Sherlock Holmes novels and someone has only seen the BBC show, they might complain that John or Mrs Hudson seem to be ooc, or of someone has only seen the Batman Animated series and is reviewing a fic based of the Nolan movies, they might question why Robin isn't helping Batman out (these are totally made up examples, but they should give you the idea of what I'm talking about; I didn't want to use actual examples from reviews I've received, because I thought that might be rude? lol). Basically, I think that if you are somewhat familiar with the characters, but not actually familiar with the specific book/show/movie/game that the fic is based on, you shouldn't assume that the writer of the fic got it wrong. Sure, you can still mention that being only familiar with a different take on those characters, something came as a surprise to you, but I guess you should assume that it is the adaptation and not the writer who changed that. If that makes any sense?

7/28/2012 #14
memingers
@Rosa, you're right. I made what I meant unclear. If you really think there are no problems at all, don't make up something, but try to actively look for mistakes as well so that you can help.
7/28/2012 #15
Desktop Warrior

More Time!responses/advice/whathaveyou:

On critique: Every story has something that can be critiqued. It might not be a flaw as much as something that wasn't explained properly and that leaves you confused. Try to be as objective as possible when reading any story. Being tactful is good - and justifying your critique is the most important thing of all - but don't fall into the trap of softening your critique to spare someone's feelings. The most effective critique assumes a high level of maturity on the author's part, characterized by an unconditional willingness to improve, and recognizing that critique of one's writing is not a personal attack. To answer Neotenial's question, a review that is completely non-complimentary is perfectly alright, as long as it shows a serious engagement with the story.

On fandoms: Having reviewed stories for multiple fandoms during my time at the RLt - many of which I'm completely unfamiliar with - I'd say knowing the canon definitely allows for a more substantial, engaging review. That said, don't be discouraged from reviewing something in an unfamiliar fandom. At the end of the day, writing is writing, and the fandom is only a small part of the story. Keep in mind the suggestions I made in my first post: these issues are common to all fictional works. A good review from outside the fandom will help the author view their own fandom from a different perspective, and may in fact help them bring their story closer to canon.

On reviewing "formulae": Don't limit yourself to a single reviewing format. Yes, writing is writing, but each individual story is different, and therefore, you'll need to focus on different things for each review you write. You want to review the story, not break it up into pre-defined categories.

7/28/2012 #16
The Bitter Kitten

In essence, I think what I enjoy in a review is evidence that someone really engaged with my story and is telling me how it affected them/ they reacted to it- whether my spag /formatting was distracting from the story, whether my characters are engaging and real and not ooc, whether the newest plot turn dives right off the edge into unbelievability or is a great twist and if they saw it coming. So specifics are good- show that you've done more than skimmed the first three sentences, and it's hard to go wrong.

7/28/2012 #17
Ventisquear

If it is all right to give completely non-complimentary review, it should be all right to write completely complimentary review as well. In other words - if you didn't like anything, you don't have to force yourself to write compliments and praise. But if you liked everything, you also don't have to search for problems.

I guess it depends on whether you want to write a review or a critique. They are not the same, though both should be appreciated.

Review gives the reader's personal feedback - what the reader liked or didn't like, emotional reactions, etc.These can be both negative or positive. Critique tries to be more objective, and focuses on how the story is written - style, tone, characterisatio, pace, setting, dialogue etc. Critique - or at least constructive criticism - should always include both praise and criticism.

7/29/2012 #18
Rosawyn

I am unpinning this topic for now because I am indecisive and I can't make up my mind. XD Well also, I guess I think that maybe more people might reply with their thoughts if it doesn't look as official. That's the thought anyway.

If it is all right to give completely non-complimentary review, it should be all right to write completely complimentary review as well. In other words - if you didn't like anything, you don't have to force yourself to write compliments and praise. But if you liked everything, you also don't have to search for problems.

That actually makes a lot of sense. Thanks for sharing your thoughts! :)

I guess it depends on whether you want to write a review or a critique. They are not the same, though both should be appreciated.

Review gives the reader's personal feedback - what the reader liked or didn't like, emotional reactions, etc.These can be both negative or positive. Critique tries to be more objective, and focuses on how the story is written - style, tone, characterisatio, pace, setting, dialogue etc. Critique - or at least constructive criticism - should always include both praise and criticism.

By these definitions, I think that it's entirely possible to give both a review and a critique at the same time.

7/29/2012 #19
darkin520

I tried posting in here twice yesterday, and the site ate both my posts. :/

So let's try this again. I have some more things I'd like to share. This is based on MY personal experience. Whether or not you agree with me is completely up to you.

First, I don't think every review needs to be critical. I go by the phrase, 'if it's not broke, don't fix it'. If your story isn't terribly confusing nor does it have spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors, I will most likely not say anything critical, especially if I don't know the fandom.

If I am familiar with the fandom, I am far more likely to pick out things that are OOC or something, but it's rare that I see it.

It's not that I never say anything critical because I do. But for every critical review I write, I probably write about ten non-critical reviews. I see nothing wrong with giving a personal cheer for someone because everyone needs to hear that sometimes. I try to give the kind of review I'd want to receive. I was told that by someone a long time ago, and I use it. And I really like to get reviews that are nice, so I try to do the same.

Now, it's not that I cannot take constructive criticism because I can. However, the most critical and hurtful reviews I have ever received have come from fellow RLt members. The people who gave them will never know how it affected me because I didn't let on that it did. But it cut my confidence for a while. For every nice review I get, it only takes one negative to get me worried...to make me think I am not very talented. Of course, every person has a different idea of what is tactful and what isn't. And every person has different sensitivities. Some have thick skins while others don't. My skin is not as thick as I'd like it to be, and I can't help how I felt. But again, this is why I think tact is extremely important. There are a thousand ways to say, "Your story needs work." But you don't need to say it in such a way that belittles the other person or makes him or her feel stupid. You don't need to be condescending.

Have I always been nice in my reviews? I may have hurt a person or two, although no one has ever mentioned. But when I am writing a critical review, I write it out and reread it before I hit submit. I do my best to think, "What if this were a review I was receiving? How would it make me feel?" And I hope I deliver it tactfully enough that it doesn't hurt the other person because, let's face it, any critical review can hurt. It's up to the reviewer to try to say it in a gentle way.

Now, for the writer, I'd like to deliver some advice as well. I know not everyone does this, but I reply to all my reviews (well, the ones that are signed, at least). But when I receive a negative review...one that's not so gushing, it's hard to be grateful. That's why I see nothing wrong with waiting for a few days to take that initial sting away. The reason being is that it's difficult for me not to sound snarky in my reply to a negative or critical review.

To be perfectly honest, I must be lucky. I do have a following in my fandom, and they are so kind. I never get critical reviews...and I'm serious. So when I play review tag, that's the ONLY time I get critical reviews. While I am grateful for the review, it's really hard when I get a critique, especially from someone who DOESN'T know my fandom. So waiting a few days does help. Then, I say something like, "Thank you for your help. I'll take a look at the things you mentioned. I appreciate it."

Now the reviewer thinks he or she did help, and they have been thanked. They don't need to know I disagreed with their review; they don't need to know if their review hurt me a little. All they know is that I was grateful.

I don't have to agree with what was said, I don't need to take the advice. Everyone has his or her opinion and much as I'd like to, I can't please everyone. While I have met lovely people who really seem to genuinely enjoy my stories, there are some who just don't.

Have I always been kind in my replies? No, I may have had a time or two I wasn't. But I did go back and apologize shortly thereafter. It's not always easy to be grateful for negative reviews. But it's best not to engage and cause a debate because it's highly unlikely either side will be convinced otherwise.

So, that's my experience, my advice. Take it if you like, or don't. But I'm often told my reviews put a smile on the writer's face...and I love hearing that. It makes me feel good to make others feel happy. And I see nothing wrong with that.

7/30/2012 #20
katriaine

I haven't posted any fics here but wrote something elsewhere and while I loved the positive reviews a stern beta pointing out all the flaws in the story was always the most useful to me.

Personally if there is nothing at all about a story that I enjoyed I don't post a review because I don't tend to finish reading stories that don't capture my attention and entertain me somehow. Life is just too short...

7/30/2012 #21
Ventisquear

@ darkin520 - I agree. I didn't receive that many negative reviews, but there are few that stung - and they are usually from people who don't know my fandom - from other forums or sites, beside FFN. I know they try to help, which is why I try to swallow my pride and reply politely. And also, because I noticed I tend to do the same thing - I'm more 'strict' with the stories that are not my own fandom. Though I always try to find something I liked and give praise as well as critique.

I think it's because when it's not your own fandom, you're less emotionally interested. You don't care about the characters enough, and usually there's not enough background to read it as a original story. So you're reading it from a bigger distance, more objectively, and the comments might then sound more harsh than intended. Does that make any sense?

But I am glad that you mentioned this. I normally always double-check every review before I post it - I, too, much prefer when I get the reply 'your review put a smile on my face' - and I'll try to be less harsh to stories not from my canon. I didn't review your stories, I think, but if my review hurt anyone, then I apologize.

7/30/2012 #22
darkin520

And also, because I noticed I tend to do the same thing - I'm more 'strict' with the stories that are not my own fandom. Though I always try to find something I liked and give praise as well as critique.

I had written that if I KNOW the fandom, I am far more likely to point out mistakes. If I don't know the fandom, I really don't. I can't comment on canon because I don't know it. Even if it's something I really don't care about, I try to remember the writer does. He or she is enthusiastic for a reason, and I do my best to take that into consideration.

Plus, fanfiction is made to be read by the FANS of a fandom. I realize that in review tag, not everyone is a fan of a fandom. But I'm not going to shout out, "I don't know this character; describe him or her," because someone who knows the fandom would know who he or she is.

Besides, as for as review taggers, it only takes a few minutes to do a quick wiki search to get a general idea of the fandom. I do this sometimes, other times, I don't. But I don't take it out on the writer that I don't know the fandom. It certainly isn't his or her fault.

Let me give you a bit of an example. I have a really hard time getting into anime. They all kind of seem the same to me, and I don't understand the difference between some of them. But in a review tag setting, I don't let this on. I do my best to give credit where credit is due, even if I don't really read the fandom. I try to see the good in what the person writes, and I never say, "I don't get the appeal."

Now if you're an anime writer, and I've given you a review, you probably had no idea I feel this way. I don't see a reason to cut a fandom down because I don't enjoy it. There are obviously a ton of people out there who do, and it would be terribly rude, in my opinion, to say otherwise.

It's just like my fandom. I write for an older show that a lot of people DON'T know. First, it only had two and half seasons, and it aired in the early '90's. So, if you're younger, you don't know it. But I do expect respect for my fandom just like I give to others for their fandom. It's something to think about.

7/30/2012 . Edited 7/30/2012 #23
The Death Frisbee

I disagree somewhat. Sorry, darkin. I feel that there is some value in showing details about the canon that are necessary for comprehension. If I introduce a character, whether he or she is canonical, including details about that character -- not as some sort of fully descriptive paragraph, but worked into the story as a whole -- helps the character feel more real. It's not needing to know the guy's driver's license and what toppings he likes on his ice cream sundae; it's needing to know hair color and voice, whatever. And asking the reader to wiki strikes me as likely to alienate the out-of-fandom reader, in all honesty.

For me, the same criterion applies here as it does to original fiction.

Fanfic may be written for fans of a given work, but in posting the work, and in seeking out-of-fandom reviews, getting pointers as to where information is needed for an out-of-fandom reviewer to understand shouldn't be a surprise.

I've received at least three reviews on my own work that I don't necessarily agree with as a whole (one of which was in-fandom, two of which weren't), but all were useful, because they told me where certain pieces might not work, or what I might want to keep an eye on in future.

7/30/2012 #24
Ventisquear

I had written that if I KNOW the fandom, I am far more likely to point out mistakes. If I don't know the fandom, I really don't. I can't comment on canon because I don't know it. Even if it's something I really don't care about, I try to remember the writer does. He or she is enthusiastic for a reason, and I do my best to take that into consideration.

I've never said I comment on FANDOM. It's true that fanfiction is made for the fans of the fandom, but that doesn't mean that they're not STORIES. There are many other things that you can comment. Besides, you admit that you don't always do a quick wiki search of the fandom you don't know - perhaps other people do that as well. But quick search of a huge fandom is not always helpful, and can be in fact quite confusing. So even if I do check it, I'll say in the review that I don't know the canon.

7/30/2012 #25
darkin520

Kate, you don't need to apologize for not agreeing with me. I know some people aren't going to agree with me, and that's fine. I still love you anyway. :)

Ventisquear, I often will tell people I'm NOT familiar with the fandom. But I still review as if I DO know it. Does that make sense? And I only do a wiki search if I find myself somewhat confused. But I can often get a good sense of the characters just from what the person writes.

I have gotten reviews from people who seemed annoyed simply because they had to read something out of their fandom. That is the kind of review I'm saying we need to be careful on. Sorry if anything I wrote was misinterpreted.

7/30/2012 #26
Appletree5

I have question. I'm trying really hard at the moment to be a better reviewer, to make the effort to actually leave a review. However, I've just come across a story that I simply don' t like and I don't know why. I think it's the style but that's not really something that the author is going to change nor would I expect them to. So, do I just not review? What would you do in this situation?

8/4/2012 #27
The Death Frisbee

I guess my advice to review or not would boil down to whether you have any concrete advice to give the author. "I don't like this and I don't know why" is, as you've said, something they can't particularly change. "I don't like points x, y, and z, and here's why -- but I do like points a, b, and c," is much more helpful.

We all have things we can't review, though. For example: If something is overly thick with description, I can't do it. Overdescription bores me. There are certain genres (action, suspense, mystery) for which I will forgive a lot too, and other genres (romance, hurt/comfort) that are harder for me to read. It's all a matter of taste and if your taste doesn't align with the author's, but there's nothing objectively useful about leaving a review, you don't have to.

8/4/2012 #28
darkin520
I have question. I'm trying really hard at the moment to be a better reviewer, to make the effort to actually leave a review. However, I've just come across a story that I simply don' t like and I don't know why. I think it's the style but that's not really something that the author is going to change nor would I expect them to. So, do I just not review? What would you do in this situation?

In this case, Apple, I think it would be best not to review. I do try to review everything I read, but there is a small number of stories where I just have nothing nice to say. That's when I follow the Thumper rule: "If ya' can't say somethin' nice, don't say nothin' at all."

Sometimes, you just cannot be pleased with what you read, but it's not the writer's fault. Anyway, that's what I'd do. Good luck.

8/4/2012 #29
Marionettes

@Appletree5, if you truly think that the author's style is turning you away from their fanfic, I personally wouldn't leave a review. Not everyone can read a stream-of-conciousness heavy description book, and so they put it down. I'd only review if I had something to say, like if they had some consistent grammar mistakes or in was a fandom you knew and were familiar with and something was OOC or something along those lines.

And kind of switching topics, I just kind of want to throw my reviewing philosophy in and say that I am still under the firm belief that writing posted/published on FF.net is a finished work and therefore should not really be berated with nitpicking. You're not they're beta reader and therefore should not be reviewed like you're their editor. (though since some people on this site clearly don't post polished stories, persistent grammar issues/spelling issues should be mentioned).

8/4/2012 #30
Page 1 2 3 4 11 .. Last Next »
Forum Moderators: Wendy Brune EHWIES, MissScorp, Madam'zelleGiry, darkin520, ShadedRogue, The Reviews Lounge Too
Rules:
  • Forums are not to be used to post stories.
  • All forum posts must be suitable for teens.
  • The owner and moderators of this forum are solely responsible for the content posted within this area.
  • All forum abuse must be reported to the moderators.
Membership Length: 2+ years 1 year 6+ months 1 month 2+ weeks new member